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. The morphology of glandularia during the six developmental stages of ‘Yujin 2’: ( g ) Young period. ( h ) Three green period. ( i ) Two white period. ( j ) Great white period. ( k ) Silver period. ( l ) Golden period. Table 1. Variations in flower

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the leaves of pecan cultivars and phenological characteristics of four developmental stages. Leaf phenotypic variation commonly occurred among the pecan cultivars, with cv ranging from 3.33% to 12.94%. ANOVA showed that leaflet width, area, droop

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; Song et al., 1995 ; Teutonico and Osborn, 1995 ; Yu et al., 2003 ). Usually, the phenotypic values for plant height at one specific developmental stage were used for QTL analysis. According to the rational points of developmental genetics, genes are

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than younger stems ( Hartmann et al., 2010 ). For this reason, the developmental stage of the cutting was examined for R. columnifera . The study on Grindelia also showed that rooting success differed among different geographical accessions ( Wassner

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, meristematic) differences at the start of dormancy may be related to the amount of chill and heat needed to complete development. In the present study, we showed there is variation in the developmental stage at the time of dormancy onset (near or after 8 Nov

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cultivars with a stable flavor profile. Thus, we analyzed the variation of flavor components in five SHB genotypes at different developmental stages and within a single harvest season. Woodruff et al. (1960) conducted a thorough analysis of blueberry

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without cold storage ( Hong and Ellis, 1996 ). Germplasms within a species can vary drastically, especially when there are geographic differences. Genetic variation among populations along a geographic gradient can suggest the presence of clinal variation

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; McCollum et al., 1988 ; Rosa, 1928 ; Schaffer et al., 1987 , 1996 ). Variation in sucrose levels also accounts for the genetic differences in total sugar contents ( Burger et al., 2000 ; Stepansky et al., 1999 ) and for the natural variability within a

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adult kale. Our hypothesis was that genetic differences (cultivars with differing leaf pigmentation) and developmental stages (from cotyledon to adult stage) influence the mineral content of kale. Therefore, the objective of this study was to determine

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observation that old L. radiata roots were replaced with new roots in April ( Nishitani et al., 2013 ). Biomass content at different developmental stages. Biomass accumulation across various L. radiata organs differed significantly at different

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