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Rewholesalers, garden centers, and other sellers of deciduous shrubs routinely receive bare-root stock in late winter or early spring for potting; however, bare-root plants are sometimes slow to establish in containers. Potted liners with well-developed root systems show potential for shortening the production cycle and permitting the development of higher-quality plants earlier in the growing season. To study the effect of nursery stock type and size on subsequent growth, two bare-root sizes and one potted liner size of `Cardinal' red osier dogwood (Cornus sericea L.), `Goldflame' spirea (Spiraea xbumalda Burv.), and `James MacFarlane' lilac (Syringa xprestoniae McKelv.) were grown in polyethylene containers of different sizes. Bare-root plants (15 and 30 cm in height) were grown in 2.7- and 6.1-L, and 6.1- and 10.3-L containers, respectively. Potted liners (0.4-L container size) were grown in 6.1- and 10.3-L containers. Plant performance was evaluated 10 and 20 weeks after potting. In general, plant quality ratings increased with container volume for all species. For `Goldflame' spirea and `James MacFarlane' lilac, best plant quality ratings occurred with 30-cm plants grown in 10.3-L containers. But for `Cardinal' redosier dogwood, plant quality ratings were highest and not significantly different for 30-cm bare-root plants and potted liners grown in 10.3-L containers.

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soil or root ball on establishment and growth of two native shrub taxa. MATERIALS AND METHODS Plant taxa used in this experiment included Rhododendron austrinum Rehd. (Florida flame azalea) and Itea virginica L. ‘Henry's Garnet’ (‘Henry's Garnet

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, Rhododendron , Taxus , and Chamaecyparis ) exhibited visual injury caused by chlorine; visual injuries were observed on five of the 10 deciduous shrubs tested. No visual injury was observed on deciduous shrubs from Day 1 to 56. On Day 57, 5% of the juvenile

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Euonymus alatus (Thunb.) Sieb. is a deciduous shrub that is a member of the celastraceae family. It is commonly called winged euonymus as a result of corky ridges found on the stems or burning bush as a result of its brilliant red fall foliage

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.5%), deciduous shrubs (11.1%), and flowering bedding plants (10.8%). These were, generally, the most important products sold by all types of landscape companies. The least important products accounted for generally ≤5% of sales. When we compared the product mix

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improvement may enable domestication and use of these native species in LWL. The genus Shepherdia (Elaeagnaceae) contains S. rotundifolia Parry, common name roundleaf buffaloberry, a shrub endemic to the IMW Colorado Plateau in southeast Utah and northern

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Elliottia racemosa , commonly called Georgia plume, is a rare deciduous shrub or small tree native to the state of Georgia. In early summer, it has beautiful plume-like clusters of white flowers from which it gets its name. Attaining heights up

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. (fragrant snowbell), are the most frequently planted members of the genus in landscapes in the United States. Styrax americanus Lam. (American snowbell) is rarely cultivated ( Dirr, 1978 ) but forms attractive shrubs or small trees up to 4 m tall that

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Abstract

Ilex (serrata ⨯ verticillata) ‘Apollo’, U.S. National Arboretum Accession No. 29739 and PI 422217, is a new introduction from the U.S. National Arboretum as part of its hybridizing program in Ilex for improved plants for landscape use (1). The selection is a large multi-stemmed deciduous staminate shrub as a preferred pollinator for its pistillate sibling selection ‘Sparkleberry’.

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Aronia melanocarpa (Michx.) Elliott, commonly known as black chokeberry, are multistemmed deciduous shrubs belonging to the Rosaceae family, subtribe Malinae ( Sun et al. 2018 ). Interest in Aronia has increased because their fruits contain

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