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Gayle M. Volk

Biological collections in herbaria, museums, botanical gardens, genebanks, breeder plots, and research institutions share many common attributes. For documentation of accessions within collections, databases have often been developed independently

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Anna Whipkey, Kirby Kalbaugh, Audra Franz, and Jules Janick

analysis of the three herbals was made by Janick et al. (2013) and in the process, a database was constructed to determine the relationship between images. The database is currently online (< http://www.hort.purdue.edu/newcrop/herbalimages >). The

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Bin Cai, Cheng-Hui Li, Ai-Sheng Xiong, Ri-He Peng, Jun Zhou, Feng Gao, Zhen Zhang, and Quan-Hong Yao

. Recently, some databases of eukaryotic transcription factors have become available on the web. TRANSFAC ( Matys et al., 2003 ), DBD ( Wilson et al., 2008 ), PlnTFDB ( Riaño-Pachón et al., 2007 ), AGRIS ( Palaniswamy et al., 2006 ), DATF ( Guo et al., 2005

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Arthur Villordon, Wambui Njuguna, Simon Gichuki, Philip Ndolo, and Don Labonte

Africa. The database name is derived from “viazi vitamu,” which means sweetpotato in Swahili, the language predominantly spoken in Kenya and in most of eastern Africa. Eastern African is generally considered as a secondary center of diversity for

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P.C. St. Amand and D.R. La Bonte

A user-friendly, menu driven, database program was developed to facilitate storage, retrieval, and manipulation of data associated with a sweetpotato breeding program. The database is written in FoxBASE+ for IBM and compatible personal computers. The database consists of a variety of test options with statistical capabilities for analysis of raw test data for commonly evaluated factors used to screen sweetpotato selections. The database also contains options which permit the user to query the stored data. An important feature is the summarization of test data for individual selections based on all the tests it has been entered into. Overall means, SDs and comparisons with user specified checks are listed in a printout for each factor along with morphological descriptors, parentage, and a note section. The database also assists the user in field research through recording of plot plans, data collection forms and related data query options.

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Gayle M. Volk and Christopher M. Richards

occurrence and related spatiotemporal information about accessions ( Darwin Core Task Group, 2011 ). The Darwin Core standards have been widely adopted by national and international databases that compile information about biological collections. Because

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Mark E. Clough, George C. Yencho, Barbara Christ, Walter DeJong, Donald Halseth, Kathleen Haynes, Melvin Henninger, Chad Hutchinson, Matt Kleinhenz, Greg A. Porter, and Richard E. Veilleux

facilitate easy access of key information, we have developed a web-based, user-friendly potato variety database to facilitate data management and access for the NE1031 project and the entire potato research community. This variety database site was designed

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Gayle M. Volk and Christopher M. Richards

plant materials, is available through the Genetic Resources Information Network (GRIN) database ( Mowder and Stoner, 1988 ; Perry et al., 1988 ; USDA, ARS, National Genetic Resources Laboratory, 2008 ). Stakeholders need access to genotypic as well

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Daofeng Liu, Jing Ma, Jianfeng Yang, Tien V. Nguyen, Huamin Liu, Renwei Huang, Shunzhao Sui, and Mingyang Li

genetic diversity and structure of 10 natural populations ( Yang et al., 2013 ). Although the whole genome of wintersweet has not been sequenced yet, a transcriptomic database of wintersweet has been established using the Illumina RNA-Seq method and a

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G.L. Davis, Edward F. Gilman, and Howard W. Beck

A large horticultural database and an electronic retrieval system for extension education programs were developed using compact disk-read only memory (CD-ROM) and World Wide Web (WWW) as the medium for information delivery. Object-oriented database techniques were used to organize the information. Conventional retrieval techniques including hypertext, full text searching, and expert systems were integrated into a complete package for accessing information stored in the database. A multimedia user interface was developed to provide a variety of capabilities including computer graphics and high resolution digitized images. Information for the CD-ROM was gathered from extension publications that were tagged using the standard generalized markup language (SGML)-based document markup language (International Standards Organization, 1986). Combining funds from the state legislator with grants from the USDA and other institutions, the CD-ROM system has been implemented in all 67 county extension offices in Florida and is available to the public as a for-sale CD-ROM. Public access is also available to most of the database through the WWW.