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Chengyan Yue and Charles Hall

Consumers typically purchase cut flowers either for their own enjoyment or to use them as gifts. Unlike many edible horticultural crops whose quality attributes can be quantified (e.g., milligrams of fiber or sugar in an apple or 1 pound of celery

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Erin M.R. Clark, John M. Dole, Alicain S. Carlson, Erin P. Moody, Ingram F. McCall, Frankie L. Fanelli, and William C. Fonteno

Each year a wide variety of new cultivars and species are evaluated in the National Cut Flower Trial Programs administered by North Carolina State University and the Association of Specialty Cut Flower Growers. These new cultivars are tested at

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Crofton Sloan and Susan S. Harkness

Roses are one of the three main flower crops produced and distributed worldwide, and the large majority of roses purchased in the United States are produced in South America ( Armitage, 2000 ). In 2006, the United States imported cut flowers valued

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Cristian E. Loyola, John M. Dole, and Rebecca Dunning

Cut flower production in the United States and Canada has resurged in recent years. A survey conducted by Granitz (2014) found that 67% of the cut flower producers in North Carolina experienced an increase in demand for cut flowers, especially

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Cristian E. Loyola, John M. Dole, and Rebecca Dunning

Today’s cut flower industry is globalized. In the United States, imports of cut flowers began in the 1960s ( Conlon, 2016 ). Over the last 20 years, cut flower exports have more than doubled in size from about $4 billion in 1995 to more than $8

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Iftikhar Ahmad, John M. Dole, Atyab Amjad, and Sagheer Ahmad

Cut flowers are highly perishable and complex plant organs that need to be properly handled and stored to preserve their value and quality ( Reid, 2002 ). In some species, quality may be lost due to foliage or petal abscission, leaf chlorosis

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Ben A. Bergmann, John M. Dole, and Ingram McCall

Successful cut flower production depends on the ability to produce crops economically in a short, predictable amount of time. Profitability of a cut flower cultivar relies on market price, yield of long, strong, and easy-to-harvest stems, manageable

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Lingfang Kong, Fan Li, Ronghui Du, Huaiting Geng, Shifeng Li, and Jihua Wang

characteristics, L. pinceana has compact and dense inflorescences with relatively long stems. Therefore, considering its potential as a cut flower species, L. pinceana is a very suitable candidate for development. Because the natural distribution of L

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Alicia L. Rihn, Chengyan Yue, Charles Hall, and Bridget K. Behe

Fresh-cut flowers have been an important part of our society since ancient Greece and continue to be enjoyed for their aesthetics on numerous holidays, as gifts, and on other occasions ( King, 2007 ). Cut flowers are also important to the U

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Chengyan Yue and Bridget K. Behe

Fresh cut flowers can be given as gifts at many different holidays and occasions. The wholesale value of domestic cut flower production was $403 million in 2008 ( USDA, 2009 ). Still, imported cut flowers account for a greater percentage of U