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Annika E. Kohler and Roberto G. Lopez

The market demand for fresh, dried, and living culinary herbs has increased over the past decade. In 2019, the wholesale value of culinary herbs produced in the United States was $58.4 million, a 16% increase from 2009 ( USDA, 2010 , 2020

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Ana Regia Alves de Araújo Hendges, Jose Wagner da Silva Melo, Marcelo de Almeida Guimaraes, and Janiquelle da Silva Rabelo

randomized block design with five treatments and five replications. The treatments consisted of kale grown as a monocrop and intercropped with culinary herbs: monocrop of kale, kale intercropped with coriander, kale intercropped with green onion, kale

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J.R. Schroeder and Alice Le Duc

Ten culinary and ornamental herbs were evaluated for time and quality of rooting of tip cuttings. The taxa included in the study were oregano (Origanum vulgare), lemon thyme (Thymus ×citriodorata), applemint (Mentha suavolens), Persian catnip (Nepeta ×faassenii), lemon balm (Melissa officinalis), southernwood (Artemisia abrotanum), caraway thyme (Thymus herba-barona), hyssop (Hyssopus officinalis), `Blue Wonder' catnip (Nepeta `Blue Wonder'), pineapplemint (Mentha suavolens var. variegata). Four replicates of each species were used. The cuttings, untreated and rooting hormone treated, were placed under intermittent mist, then cuttings potted when a 1- to 1.5-inch root ball had developed. Most of the stock suffered from some chlorosis during rooting; southernwood cuttings particularly displayed severe chlorosis which was overcome with 2 weeks of constant-feed fertilizer after potting. Oregano displayed the best results, rooting in seven days with or without treatment. It produced a sellable 4-inch pot in 31 days from sticking the cuttings. Lemon thyme, applemint, Persian catnip, and lemon balm all rooted in 14 days if treated. No difference was observed in days to rooting between treated and untreated lemon thyme. Untreated cuttings of lemon balm, applemint, and Persian catnip rooted in 25 to 30 days. Treated applemint cuttings not only rooted more quickly but produced a marketable 4-inch pot in significantly less time. Southernwood and caraway thyme rooted in 25 days, with no significant difference between treated and untreated cuttings. Hyssop, pineapplemint, and `Blue Wonder' catnip took about 30 days, also with no significant difference between treated and untreated cuttings.

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Louis E. Petersen

190 WORKSHOP 22 (Abstr. 1055-1058) Production and Utilization of Herbs, Spices, and Medicinal Plants: Pacific Northwest and Caribbean

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Manuel C. Palada and Stafford M.A. Crossm

190 WORKSHOP 22 (Abstr. 1055-1058) Production and Utilization of Herbs, Spices, and Medicinal Plants: Pacific Northwest and Caribbean

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Weiguang Yi and Hazel Y. Wetzstein

antioxidant capacity than fresh samples, suggesting low-temperature drying may not only be a good postharvest means to store medicinal/culinary herbs, but provides improved biochemical activity. Exposure to 70 °C oven-drying caused significant antioxidant loss

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Danielle D. Treadwell, George J. Hochmuth, Robert C. Hochmuth, Eric H. Simonne, Lei L. Davis, Wanda L. Laughlin, Yuncong Li, Teresa Olczyk, Richard K. Sprenkel, and Lance S. Osborne

produce combined with the increasing market share of “ready-to-eat” products indicates the potential for expansion of an organic culinary herb market. Culinary herbs are herbaceous aromatic plants grown and marketed fresh or dried as transplants or cut and

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Karen L. Panter, Timmothy M. Gergeni, Casey P. Seals, and Andrea R. Garfinkel

and daylength conditions experienced in the hobby high tunnels. Herbs Three species of fresh culinary herbs were chosen for study in 2013 and 2014: oregano, marjoram, and garlic chive ( Fig. 1C ). The latter was used in 2015. Each of the species in all

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Alexander G. Litvin, Christopher J. Currey, and Lester A. Wilson

Culinary herbs are used globally as ingredients in cuisine and as therapeutic components in medications [ Cook and Samman, 1996 ; U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), 2011 ]. Herbs such as basil ( Ocimum basilicum ), dill ( Anethum graveolens

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Kellie J. Walters and Christopher J. Currey

Wilkins, 2005 ), and as a culinary herb ( Simon et al., 1999 ). Among these different uses, basil is most commonly used as a culinary herb ( Simon et al., 1999 ). Sweet basil is the most commonly cultivated basil species for culinary use, though lemon