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There have been reports of cover crops increasing the yield of the following crops ( Clark, 2007 ; Dabney et al., 2010 ; Delgado et al., 2007 ). However, there is a need for additional research on the potential benefits that cover crops may have

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subsequent yield benefits to strawberry plants. Garland et al. (2011) suggested summer cover crop growth in NC strawberry production may be enhanced through increased seeding rate and compost additions when cover crops are planted; yet, research is lacking

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becomes a major challenge when two critical growth stages of the crop plants occur at the same time ( Coolman and Hoyt, 1993 ). For example, tomatoes relay cropped with okra had reduced yields compared with monocrop production ( Olasantan, 1985 ). However

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protect soil resources while increasing or maintaining yields. Cover crop use can improve soil physical properties, increase soil organic carbon, conserve soil water, reduce surface runoff, and recycle nutrients ( Hubbell and Sartain, 1980 ; Mansoer et al

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result in larger and more diverse populations of pollinators around those crops. Even though the addition of companion plantings to crops has been known to increase insect diversity, further research is needed to determine if crop yield can also be

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tillage and herbicides and offer additional benefits to the soil and environment while also increasing or maintaining vegetable yield ( Kumar et al., 2009 ). Studies have reported successful weed suppression using cover crops ( Bugg and Dutcher, 1989

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pest populations and reduce soil erosion, nutrient leaching, and contamination of surface and groundwater ( Hartwig and Ammon, 2002 ; Hutchinson and McGiffen, 2000 ). However, cover crops could also reduce the subsequent crop yield ( Al-Khatib et al

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evaporation under conservation tillage generally increases plant-available water and subsequent crop yield potential ( Griffith et al., 1986 ). This increased available water is particularly important in dry land cropping systems in arid and semiarid regions

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the yield attainable under existing farm conditions that takes into account all the factors limiting the production process and the crop yield. Meteorological factors directly influence potential crop productivity, regulating its transpiration

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could reduce fertilizer input and nutrient leaching while maintaining desirable crop yield. In Michigan, onions are usually seeded in April and harvested in September. The long growing season does not provide an adequate window to grow warm-season cover

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