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Rick A. Boydston, Treva Anderson and Steven F. Vaughn

The use of herbicides in container-grown ornamentals is often limited as a result of the lack of registered products for use in greenhouses and the difficulty in assuring crop safety on numerous species grown in ornamental nurseries. Typically

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Rick A. Boydston, Harold P. Collins and Steven F. Vaughn

separate studies, 20 seed of annual bluegrass ( Poa annua ) and common chickweed ( Stellaria media ) were seeded on the surface of 7.5-L pots containing 0%, 1.25%, 2.5%, 5%, 10%, and 20% (by weight) DDGS-amended potting mix. Containers were placed in a

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Kenneth G. McCabe, James A. Schrader, Samy Madbouly, David Grewell and William R. Graves

Valued at $10.5 billion in 2009, the container crops industry is a large sector of commercial horticulture that produces over four billion plants in containers per year and uses over 1.6 billion pounds of petroleum plastic for containers ( Schrader

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Andrew H. Jeffers, William E. Klingeman, Charles R. Hall, Marco A. Palma, David S. Buckley and Dean A. Kopsell

might occur between different methodologies of liner production, we modeled three of the most prominent liner production systems: 1) field ground bed system, 2) polyhouse-covered ground bed system, and 3) polyhouse-covered container system. Production

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Geraldine J. Cashion and Thomas H. Yeager

144 POSTER SESSION (Abstr. 547–556) Container Production–Woody Ornamentals/Landscape

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Marion J. Packett, Alex X. Niemiera, J. Roger Harris and Ronald F. Walden

144 POSTER SESSION (Abstr. 547–556) Container Production–Woody Ornamentals/Landscape

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Jeff B. Million and Thomas H. Yeager

The container nursery industry is facing severe restrictions on water use ( Beeson et al., 2004 ). Container substrate water deficits can be measured directly by weighing ( Beeson, 2011 ; Million et al., 2010 ; Owen et al., 2007 ), indirectly with

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Susmitha Nambuthiri, Robert L. Geneve, Youping Sun, Xueni Wang, R. Thomas Fernandez, Genhua Niu, Guihong Bi and Amy Fulcher

Large-scale container-grown nursery plant production began in the early 1950s and helped to diversify the nursery industry. Most of the clay, recycled metal, and wooden containers initially used in nurseries were replaced by plastic containers in

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Anthony L. Witcher, Fulya Baysal-Gurel, Eugene K. Blythe and Donna C. Fare

of growing flowering dogwood, the long production cycle and limited transplant window for B&B nursery stock have led to increased interest in growing flowering dogwood in containers. Additionally, the market for container-grown flowering dogwood has

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John G. Schluckebrier and Chris A. Martin

144 POSTER SESSION (Abstr. 547–556) Container Production–Woody Ornamentals/Landscape