Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 569 items for :

  • community gardens x
Clear All

. Revenue from conducting plant trials can be sufficient to support student workers and interns, providing additional educational opportunities. Community. The campus community (faculty, staff, and students) and the civic community value the garden. In

Full access

cities across the United States have created usable green space in vacant lots in the form of community gardens when green spaces such as parks and greenbelts were limited. According to the American Community Gardening Association (ACGA), there were an

Free access

Community gardens are shared spaces that confer both physical and social benefits to participants ( Draper and Freedman, 2010 ; Litt et al., 2011 ). These spaces are found in both rural and urban settings, across socioeconomically diverse

Full access

attitudes toward and preferences for these foods ( Heim et al., 2009 ). In urban areas, this can be achieved through schoolyard and community gardens. There is growing interest in the benefits of urban agriculture for youth education as evidenced by the

Open Access

members to arboreta and public gardens, specifically, by asking what traditional and non-traditional programs might appeal. In addition, this study was designed to identify potential barriers, perceived or real, that might dissuade community members from

Free access

association or organization, public gardens also promote the nontangible benefits they provide to the surrounding community and to the membership base, such as improving the cultural and aesthetic value of the community and offering volunteer opportunities to

Full access
Authors: and

Abstract

Many American urban dwellers seem to be discovering a fact known to most of their European peers for many years: a garden can provide inexpensive, high quality food as well as recreation and relaxation. The green thumb boom has been particularly evident in the sprouting of community garden projects in many college communities where students are anxious to supplement meager incomes and opportunities to work with living plants. Community garden projects often feature considerable diversity in cultural management philosophy and work load allocation but share a common goal of abundant food production and enjoyment for the gardeners.

Open Access

The Charleston Area Children's Garden Project is a community-sponsored initiative affiliated with the Clemson Univ. Coastal Research and Education Center and the Landscapes for Learning Program. The Project transforms vacant lots and other unused spaces into neighborhood outdoor learning centers. Garden activities are free and open to all. The children plan, plant, and tend the garden under the supervision and guidance of adult Garden Leaders. Whatever is grown, the children take home. A “sidewalk learning session” is held in the garden each week. At these sessions, the garden manager, parents, neighbors, or visitors teach the youngsters about garden-related topics from insects to siphons, from origami to pickling, and a multitude of other topics designed to stimulate learning and child participation. The Project is designed to give children a hands-on learning experience outside the classroom setting, to make neighborhoods more attractive, and to build a sense of community. The Project is totally funded by grant monies and has grown from one garden in 2000 to ten gardens in 2004. Gardens are planted with the involvement of neighborhood associations, the Boys and Girls Clubs, the Homeless Shelter, and in conjunction with after-school programs. The Project makes use of such resources as The Growing Classroom and the Junior Master Gardener Teaching Guide. An array of program materials has been developed that are designed for use in the coastal communities of South Carolina.

Free access

Virginia Cooperative Extension's (VCE) Master Gardener!Tree Steward program (MGTS) provides advanced training in leadership development and arboriculture to Master Gardener (MG) volunteer educators so that they may expand the influence of extension through leadership in community forestry. According to a statewide survey, 70% of VCE MGs and agents with MG programs would like to be involved in community tree programming. Only 26% were currently involved. Typically, agents cite limited staff and volunteer resources as the primary factors in restricting program expansion. Furthermore, 90% of municipal foresters indicated they would like to work with trained volunteers. The MGTS program simultaneously answers the desire of MGs to expand their role in the community landscape and the need of VCE to expand its outreach with increasingly limited resources. MGTS training, guided by a 10-unit resource book, integrates technical and program management expertise to foster volunteer pride and self-sufficiency. This allows MGTSs to coordinate much of their own training and recruit and manage large numbers of non-MG volunteers to whom they can provide limited training for specific projects, thus, allowing program expansion without additional staff.

Free access

The Virginia Cooperative Extension (VCE) Advanced Master Gardener-Tree Steward (AMGTS) program provides advanced training in leadership development and arboriculture to MG volunteer educators so they may expand the influence of extension through leadership in community forestry. A statewide survey of agents, MGs, and foresters served as the basis for developing the training package, which was funded in part by the Virginia Department of Forestry. According to a statewide survey, 70% of VCE MGs and extension agents with MG programs would like to be involved in community tree programming, while only 26% was currently involved. Typically, agents cited limited staff and volunteer resources as the primary factors in restricting program expansion. Furthermore, 90% of municipal foresters indicated they would like to work with trained volunteers. The AMGTS program simultaneously answers the desire of MGs to expand their role in the community landscape and the need of VCE to expand its outreach with increasingly limited resources. AMGTS training, guided by a 10-unit resource book, integrates technical and program management expertise to foster volunteer pride and self-sufficiency. This allows MG tree stewards to coordinate much of their own training and recruit and manage non-MG volunteers to whom they can provide limited training for specific projects, thus allowing program expansion without additional staff. The training is designed for delivery by knowledgeable professionals in the local community, such as arborists, horticulturists, college professors, extension specialists, MGs, and others who can provide quality training following the program guidelines.

Full access