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Soon O. Park, Dermot P. Coyne, and James R. Steadman

Bean rust, caused by Uromyces appendiculatus, is an important disease of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.). The objective was to identify RAPD markers linked to the gene (Ur-6) for specific resistance to rust race 51 using bulked segregant analysis in an F2 segregating population from the common bean cross pinto `Olathe' (resistant to rust) × great northern Nebraska #1 selection 27 (susceptible to rust). A single dominant gene controlling specific resistance to race 51 was hypothesized based on F2 segregation, and then was confirmed in the F3 generation. A good fit to a 3:1 ratio for band presence to band absence for each of three markers was observed in 100 F2 plants. Three RAPD markers were detected in a coupling phase linkage with the Ur-6 gene. Coupling-phase RAPD marker OAB14.600 was the most closely linked to the Ur-6 gene at a distance of 3.5 cM among these markers. No RAPD markers were identified in a repulsion phase linkage with the Ur-6 gene. The RAPD markers linked to the gene for specific rust resistance of Middle American origin detected here, along with other independent rust resistance genes from other germplasm, could be utilized to pyramid multiple genes into a bean cultivar for more durable rust resistance.

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H.Z. Zaiter, D.P. Coyne, and J.R. Steadman

Published as Paper no. 8856, Journal Series, Nebraska Agricultural Research Division. Research was conducted under Title XII Bean/Cowpea CRSP Project-Univ. of Nebraska and Dominican Republic under AID Contract no. DAN-1310-G-SS-6008-00 and also

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Geunhwa Jung, Dermot P. Coyne, Paul W. Skroch, James Nienhuis, E. Arnaud-Santana, James Bokosi, H.M. Ariyarathne, James R. Steadman, James S. Beaver, and Shawn M. Kaeppler

the Title XII Bean/Cowpea CRSP (AID contract no. DNA-1310-GSS-6008-00). We also appreciate assistance of technicians Lisa Sutton and James Reiser. The cost of publishing this paper was defrayed in part by the payment of page charges. Under postal

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Soon O. Park, Dermot P. Coyne, and James R. Steadman

Bean rust, caused by Uromyces appendiculatus, is a major disease of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris). The objective was to identify RAPD markers linked to the gene (Ur-7) for specific resistance to rust race 59 using bulked segregant analysis in an F2 segregating population from the common bean cross GN1140 (resistant to rust) × Nebraska #1 (susceptible to rust). A single dominant gene controlling specific resistance to race 59 was found in the F2 and was confirmed in the F3. Seven RAPD markers were detected in a coupling-phase linkage with the Ur-7 gene. Coupling-phase RAPD markers OAA11.500, OAD12.550, and OAF17.900 with no recombination to the Ur-7 gene were found. Three RAPD markers were identified in a repulsion-phase linkage with the Ur-7 gene among the three markers at a distance of 8.2 cM. This is the first report on RAPD markers linked to the Ur-7 gene in common bean. The RAPD markers linked to the gene for specific rust resistance of Middle American origin detected here, along with other independent rust resistance genes from other germplasm, could be used to pyramid multiple genes into a bean cultivar for more-durable rust resistance.

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Geunhwa Jung, Dermot P. Coyne, James Bokosi, James R. Steadman, and James Nienhuis

journal series paper no. 12009. Research was conducted under projects 20-036 and 20-042. We acknowledge financial support from the Title XII Bean/Cowpea CRSP (AID contract no. DNA-1310-G-SS-6008-00). We also appreciate assistance of technicians Daniella O

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Charles J. Wasonga, Marcial A. Pastor-Corrales, Timothy G. Porch, and Phillip D. Griffiths

Internacional de Agricultura Tropical, 2006 ). Common bean rust, caused by the basidiomycete fungus Uromyces appendiculatus , is a destructive disease of dry and snap beans worldwide and is a particularly endemic and severe disease in eastern and southern

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Charles J. Wasonga, Marcial A. Pastor-Corrales, Timothy G. Porch, and Phillip D. Griffiths

in particular, common bean rust caused by the fungus Uromyces appendiculatus, which can severely limit the yield and quality of the snap bean crops ( CIAT, 2006 ; Wasonga et al., 2010 ; Wortmann et al., 1998 ). Rust is a destructive disease of

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Phillip N. Miklas and J. Rennie Stavely

Foliar diseases are a major constraint to cultivated tepary bean (Phaseolus acutifolius A. Gray var. latifolius Freeman) production in some environments. The reactions of 12 cultivated teparies to eight individual races (41, 47, 49, 51, 53, 58, 67, and 73) of the bean rust fungus Uromyces appendiculatus (Pers.) Unger var. appendiculatus maintained at Beltsville, Md., were examined under greenhouse conditions. These diverse races, used together, overcome all of the major rust-resistance genes present within the 19 host differential cultivars of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.). Seven lines (GN-605-s, GN-610-s, PI 321638-s, PI 502217-s, Neb-T-6-s, Neb-T-8a-s, and Neb-T-15-s) exhibited similarly high levels of resistance (immunity or necrotic spots without sporulation) to all eight races. Inheritance of resistance was examined across five susceptible × resistant (S × R) and three resistant × resistant (R × R) populations. The rust reactions in the F1, F2, and F3 generations derived from S × R crosses revealed that the immune or necrotic resistance response was conditioned by a single locus exhibiting incomplete dominance. The rust resistance of four lines tested for allelism in R × R crosses was found to be derived from the same gene. This apparent lack of variability for rust resistance suggests that a single introgression event may realize the full potential for cultivated tepary bean to contribute rust resistance to common bean through interspecific hybridization. In addition, the limited variability for resistance to the highly variable rust pathogen in cultivated tepary bean supports the occurrence of a “bottleneck effect” during domestication of this species, as observed in germplasm diversity studies.

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Ana B. Monteagudo, A. Paula Rodiño, Margarita Lema, María De la Fuente, Marta Santalla, Antonio M. De Ron, and Shree P. Singh

fellowships from the Galician Government and the University of Santiago de Compostela to Ana B. Monteagudo. We are also grateful to the CRF-INIA (Alcalá de Henares, Spain) for supplying seeds of some common bean accessions, the University of Idaho and Seminis

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Dermot P. Coyne, Eladio Arnaud Santana, James Beaver, James R. Steadman, Graciela Godoy Lutz, Douglas Maxwell, and Lisa Sutton

Bean golden mosaic (BGM), rust (RU), web blight (WB), and common blight (CB) are major constraints affecting bean yields in the Dominican Republic (DR). The objectives of the USAID DR supported project were to educate graduate students, improve research facilities and equipment, institutionalize the project, and develop a comprehensive bean disease management program. The project trained 25 researchers. A national center for bean improvement (CIAS) was established. Facilities for plant pathology, germplasm storage, and screenhouses were built and equipment and vehicles were acquired. The high-yielding rust-resistant red mottled bean variety `PC-50' was introduced and grown on about 60% of the hectarage. However, BGM became a serious problem with the increase of the white fly population (vector of BGMV) due to increased vegetable production. Under severe BGM, yields were low in plantings made after 15 Dec. The combination of the use of `PC-50', along with a fallow period with delayed planting until early November, reduced the populations of white fly, BGM, RU, and CB and led to a dramatic yield increase of beans and to self sufficiency in beans in the DR. PC-50 became damaged by a new RU race and a resistant line PC-21-SMA (UPR) was released. New bean lines with resistance to BGM, WB, RU, and CBB are being tested for release.