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on the science of plants as they relate to people, have not established consistent collaborations with social scientists or public health researchers, as evidenced by the few coauthorships in research journals outside horticulture ( Dorn et al., 2018

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disadvantages of JC/CC and LG viticulture and enology program collaboration from the perspective of LG specialists that conduct viticulture and enology activities. Materials and methods The researcher-designed survey instrument ( Table 1 ) was sent to 69

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. Assigning authorship when many authors are involved can be difficult, but was necessary. It was also essential to educate administrators that several coauthors was not automatically a red flag; it signified extraordinary collaboration and selflessness as

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at the American Society for Horticultural Science (ASHS) Annual Conference in Waikoloa, HI. Summaries of these reports are presented herein. Collaboration and communication among industry, academia, the scientific community, and consumers are

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in other disciplines, volunteer assistance, and education and research of microbes and organic amendments without corruption from corporate funding to promote chemically sustained landscapes Question 7: How important is collaboration to your

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and the LA studio overlapped would have improved coordination and collaboration between the two groups. The success of this teaching model, which spanned one summer and two academic semesters, required effective communications, coordination, teamwork

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aspects of pineapple production including planting, fertilization, pest management, soil management, harvest and postharvest, economics, and collaboration among growers. In the present article, only aspects related to effects of planting and fertilization

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Extension services around the globe face increasingly limited financial support, yet rural populations require services, training and access to information. In sub-Saharan African countries the demands are particularly severe. Farmer to extension staff ratios are generally over 2000 to 1 and resource constraints are severe, which greatly restricts outreach efforts. Examples are presented of recent innovations from the southern Africa country of Malawi. These include collaboration across private and public institutions. Some extension agents have shifted from a transferring technology mode to a catalytic role where agents help link up diverse stakeholders, from farmers and researchers to potential buyers and input suppliers. Extension has helped farmers respond to new market opportunities, including a food colorant, the paprika pepper (Capsicum annuum), and a multi-use grain and vegetable, pigeon pea (Cajanus cajan). Product quality is critical for these markets and industry organizations have invested in training that involves government extension staff, private crop advisors and farmers. A collaborative team approach across industry, nongovernmental organizations and government services has facilitated farmer access to inputs, new cultivars and training in improved crop management and post-harvest techniques. Many challenges remain, such as outreach to farmers located far from infrastructure and those with limited formal education or no experience with entrepreneurship. Extension must continue to reinvent itself to reach all farmers.

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ASHS HortBase provides opportunities for change—change in how we author and deliver information to meet the needs of the inquirer for 24-hour access to specific, concise information for planning and decision support; change from individual autonomy to global collaboration to meet more economically the increasing needs for quality horticultural information with decreasing resources; change, by adding ASHS peer review, to meet the inquirer's need for validated information and to strengthen the educator's efforts in developing scholarly, shared information resources; change to strengthen the interaction between the educator and inquirer; change to broaden and enhance ASHS's role in providing validated, up-to-date horticultural information. HortBase is a service that ASHS is uniquely qualified to provide to its members and to worldwide horticultural inquirers. HortBase's unique characteristic is the dynamic pool of ASHS members who will serve as volunteer authors and reviewers, as well as users of HortBase. ASHS members will be the continuous infrastructure to sustain HortBase and to ensure its continuous evolution and renewal.

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A collaborative project between the Oregon State University Extension Service, and the green industry and allied professional organizations resulted in an educational seminar series for landscape professionals. In 2003 and 2004, the seminar series consisted of seven 3.5-hour sessions covering a range of horticultural topics and capitalized on expertise of extension personnel and green industry professionals. After the 2004 series, a survey was sent to all participants to determine attendance, overall evaluation, usefulness and applicability of information, participant learning, and behavior change as a result of the seminars. The response rate was 31%. Overall, participants gave the seminars a positive rating. A majority (83%) of respondents reported they had applied information learned at the seminar(s), and showed a significant increase in understanding of a subject as a result of participating in the seminar(s). Further, 98% of those who applied this information reported making multiple changes to their practices or recommendations to clients in the 6 months following the seminars.

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