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Research Coalition (FSRC) was formed to provide information regarding sustainable production techniques for growers. Forming a coalition has allowed the group to broaden our expertise to have a more meaningful impact on growers’ production practices. The

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concept of an umbrella organization was presented as a framework for the discussion at this meeting. Facilitated discussion at this organizational meeting resulted in the formation of the Kentucky Horticulture Council (KHC) as a broad coalition with a

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This research was supported by the California Tristeza Research Coalition, and the Ira J. Condit Research Fund of the Univ. of California at Riverside. We gratefully thank Dr. Deborah M. Mathews and Professor Allan Dodds in the Dept. of

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The BBG is a facility of the City of Birmingham Park and Recreation Board and operates as a coalition of the City's professional staff and resources as well as those of the Botanical Society (Friends), Alabama Cooperative Extension System (both groups maintaining offices at the BBG), 2 local community colleges, 12 specialized plant societies (that aid in the maintenance of collections), 100+ garden clubs, numerous related groups, and a strong community support. Current discussions with the University of Alabama in Birmingham will lead to certified programs at the Gardens. There are no formal contracts but informal agreements that are formed for each project. The Society sponsored the 1980 Master Plan and updates it every 10 years, employs a professional educator, and sponsors numerous special activities and programs, many in conjunction with the previously mentioned groups. Internships are hired and paid through the City. Students are rotated weekly through the various operations of the Gardens, including administration, education, taxonomy, and the Library. A special project is done in the area of interest to the student.

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Industry involvement is a critical aspect of the Specialty Crops Research Initiative (SCRI). Both a mandate for need and funding are necessary from industry to develop a successful SCRI project. The National Grape and Wine Initiative (NGWI), a nationwide coalition representing all segments of the grape (Vitis sp.) industry including raisin, juice, fresh grape and wine interests, identified extension education as a critical need and charged its extension/outreach committee to concentrate on ensuring industry members are aware of and have access to findings from grape and grape products research. To achieve this goal, the committee decided that a comprehensive online information and educational resource would play an important role. In 2009, the eXtension Grape Community of Practice (GCoP) was funded by the SCRI. The NGWI was active in soliciting letters of endorsement and buy-in from the industry for the project. The Missouri Wine and Grape Board (MWGB) also contributed $20,000 per year for three years to help offset the matching requirement. Research-based grape proposals in subsequent rounds of the SCRI in 2010 and 2011 wishing to have the approval of NGWI have been strongly encouraged to include the GCoP as a portion of their extension component. For the 2011 round of SCRI proposals, this led to the GCoP being included in three projects, two of which were funded. Exploration of future avenues for funding will include subcontracts from other grant awards, NGWI, industry sponsorships, and other creative methods.

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In this presentation, an overview of the debates regarding sustainable agriculture will be provided, with a review of the interactions among interest groups, the Congress and the U.S. Department of Agriculture regarding the development of programs to promote more “sustainable” agricultural practices. First, the legislative debates over the language and programs included in the 1985 and 1990 Farm Bills will be provided. Second, a summary overview will be provided of the key elements of the sustainable agriculture subtitle of the 1990 Farm Bill (Title 16B). Third, there will be a review of the discussions among representatives of the Land-Grant universities, advocates of sustainable agriculture, commodity group representatives, and USDA officials regarding the implementation of sustainable agriculture mandates in the 1990 Farm Bill. Fourth, current efforts to develop a coalition of support for funding for sustainable agriculture efforts will be discussed. Fifth, the interactions between efforts to promote sustainable agriculture and other environmental efforts will be considered, particularly in regards to the Clean Water Act, the implementation of the Coastal Zone Management Act, and new farm management planning requirements. During the discussion, where appropriate, specific examples will be provided that demonstrate the potential impact of these issues on horticultural sciences and production.

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AVRDC–The World Vegetable Center was established in 1971 as a not-for-profit international agricultural research institute whose mission is to reduce malnutrition and poverty among the poor through vegetable research and development. Over the past 30 years, AVRDC has developed a vast array of international public goods. The Center plays an essential role in bringing international and interdisciplinary teams together to develop technologies, empower farmers, and address major vegetable-related issues in the developing world. In its unique role, AVRDC functions as a catalyst to 1) build international and interdisciplinary coalitions that engage in vegetable and nutrition issues; 2) generate and disseminate improved germplasm and technologies that address economic and nutritional needs of the poor; 3) collect, characterize, and conserve vegetable germplasm resources for worldwide use; and 4) provide globally accessible, user-friendly, science-based, appropriate technology. In enhancing and promoting vegetable production and consumption in developing world, AVRDC's research programs contribute to increased productivity of the vegetable sector, equity in economic development in favor of rural and urban poor, healthy and more diversified diets for low-income families, environmentally friendly and safe production of vegetables, and improved sustainability of cropping systems. Recent achievements at AVRDC that greatly impact tropical horticulture in the developing world include virus-resistant tomatoes raising farmers income, hybrid sweet pepper breaking the yield barrier in the tropics, flood-resistant chili peppers opening new market opportunities, broccoli varieties for monsoon season, pesticide-free eggplant and leafy vegetable production systems and fertilizer systems that protect the environment. Beyond vegetable crops, AVRDC is playing an important role in expanding and promoting research and development efforts for high value horticultural crops, including fruit, ornamentals, and medicinal plants through its new Global Horticulture Initiative. AVRDC believes that horticulture crop production provides jobs and is an engine for economic growth. The important role AVRDC–The World Vegetable Center plays in developing and promoting tropical horticultural crops is discussed in this paper.

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during establishment than those with low WSC content. Broad Industry Coalition Has Positively Impacted Kentucky Horticulture Ingram (p. 817) describes extension education methods used to assess the need for and to assist in the organization of the

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the National Grape and Wine Initiative (NGWI), a coalition of the grape industry. The NGWI charged its extension/outreach committee to ensure that information from various aspects of grape research be available to industry members. The paper describes

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programs in recognition of declining state and federal support. A coalition of walnut, pistachio, and almond growers conducted a detailed study on the demographics of extension specialists and farm advisors critical to tree nut research and extension and it

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