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Michael P. O'Neill and James P. Dobrowolski

Since 1990, considerable effort has been expended to characterize the impact of human activities on global climate [ Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), 2001 ; IPCC, 2007 ; Karl et al., 2009 ]. Potential impacts of global change

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Virginia I. Lohr

According to a recent report by the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), “Climate change poses unprecedented challenges to U.S. agriculture because of the sensitivity of agricultural productivity and costs to changing climate conditions

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Soo-Hyung Kim and Bert Cregg

global population. A growing volume of recent scientific research is devoted to assessing climate change impacts and developing adaptation strategies in agriculture for achieving food security in future climates. Many of these studies have focused on

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Claire Woodward, Lee Hansen, Fleur Beckwith, Regina S. Redman, and Rusty J. Rodriguez

The greatest threats to agricultural sustainability in the 21st century are drought, increasing temperatures, and soil salinization, all of which are being exacerbated by climate change (< http://www.copenhagendiagnosis.com >). Three approaches

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William L. Bauerle and Joseph D. Bowden

-to-atmosphere microclimate interactions in a changing climate. We used a three-dimensional spatially explicit individual plant process model, MAESTRA (Multi-Array Evaporation Stand Tree Radiation A) ( Wang and Jarvis, 1990 ) to investigate and separate the contributions of

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Brenner L. Freeman, Janet C. Stocks, Dennis L. Eggett, and Tory L. Parker

) plants that have been nourished from irrigation and fertilization throughout the summer. The dry climate results in berries that can lose moisture more quickly but are otherwise similar to raspberries grown in other climates (Cornaby Farms, personal

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Gladis M. Zinati

Climate change refers to any significant shift or variability in temperature, precipitation, humidity, light, or wind. These changes may be of relatively short duration or last for an extended period that could be decades or longer

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Roger Kjelgren, Yongyut Trisurat, Ladawan Puangchit, Nestor Baguinon, and Puay Tan Yok

cities as a proxy for climate change; which urban tree species have succeeded in tropical cities can yield insights into potential climate-induced changes in tropical forest types. In turn, which tropical tree species that may adapt best to climate change