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content meter (Hansatech Instruments, Hitchin, UK), the Dualex leafclip sensor (Force-A, Paris, France), and the MC-100 chlorophyll meter (Apogee Instruments, Logan, UT) have been developed following a similar protocol ( Kalaji et al., 2017 ). Optical

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chlorophyll concentration, this research evaluated the feasibility of collecting indirect measurements of chlorophyll content. A new pocket optical NDVI sensor unit and the SPAD chlorophyll meter have not been studied for assessment of N status of potted

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absorbance at 660 nm and 940 nm, respectively. Both SPAD and atLEAF instruments measure light transmission through a small area of the leaf, 2 × 3 mm and 9 × 9 mm, respectively, while in contact with the sensor. Leaf chlorophyll content and chlorophyll meter

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concentration ( Hardin et al., 2012 ). Besides SPAD, atLEAF is a newly developed chlorophyll sensor that is a less expensive alternative to the SPAD meter. Both meters measure transmittance through leaf surfaces in wavelengths associated with chlorophyll, thus

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Thermography, or IR imaging, measures the radiation bands from 9,000 to 14,000 nm using a sensor array in which each sensor is equitable with the pixel of a digital image. Each pixel in the digital image contains the emitted IR energy of the object

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rate (E), chlorophyll fluorescence (F v /F m ), and water potential (WP) of Cornus alba seedlings that were irrigated for 63 d with various substrate volumetric water contents (VWCs) maintained using a soil moisture sensor-controlled automatic

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Several studies in the midwestem United States have shown that chlorophyll meter readings (Minolta SPAD 502) are useful in determining the N status of corn (Zea Mays L.), and show promise as a tool for the efficient N management of corn. Studies were conducted to evaluate the potential of the `chlorophyll meter for evaluating N deficiencies in lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.). Data for chlorophyll meter readings, midrib nitrate-N, lettuce growth rate, and marketable lettuce yield were collected in five N fertility experiments in 1993 and 1994. Chlorophyll meter readings not only varied among lettuce types (butter, cos, leaf, crisphead), but also among cultivars of the crisphead type. Chlorophyll meter readings were generally poorly correlated to midrib nitrate-N levels and marketable lettuce yield. Lettuce leaves have more color variation than corn leaves, and perhaps this variation in relation to the small sensor size on the SPAD 502 confounded readings. The observation that subtle N deficiencies in lettuce are usually manifested in growth rate reduction rather than abrupt color changes may also limit the usefulness of the chlorophyll meter for lettuce.

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Nitrogen (N) is often supplied to plants in excess to minimize the possibility of encountering N deficiency that would reduce the plant quality due to leaf chlorosis and necrosis. This is not only costly, but it can reduce the quality of plants, predispose the plants to biotic stress such as Botrytisgray mold, and extend the production cycle. Several tools can be used to identify N deficiency in plants, and most are based on chlorophyll reflectance or transmittance. While sensitive when plants are experiencing N deficiency, spectral signals can saturate in an ample N supply and make it difficult to discern sufficient and supra-optimal N nondestructively. Three diverse ornamental species (begonia, Begoniacea×tuberhybrida; butterflybush, Buddlejadavidii; and geranium, Pelargonium×hortorum) were grown with a broad range of N supplied (1.8 to 58 mm) in three separate studies that resulted in a range of 1.8% to 6% tissue N concentration. Using a spectroradiometer, we measured reflectance from the whole plants twice over a period of 3 weeks. A first-derivative analysis of the data identified six wavebands that were strongly correlated to both begonia and butterflybush tissue N concentration (r 2 ∼ 0.9), and two of these also correlated well to geranium N concentration. These wavebands did not correlate to chlorophyll peak absorbance, but rather blue, green, red, and far-red “edges” of known plant pigments. These wavebands hold promise for use as a nondestructive indicator of N status over a much broader range of tissue N concentration than current sensors can reliably predict.

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A new chlorophyll fluorescence (F) sensor system called FIRM (fluorescence interactive response monitor) was developed that measures F at low irradiance. This system can produce a theoretical estimate of Fo at zero irradiance for which we have coined a new fluorescence term, Fα. The ability of Fα to detect fruit and vegetable low-O2 stress was tested in short-term (4-day) studies on chlorophyll-containing fruit [apple (Malus sylvestris (L.) Mill. var. domestica (Borkh.) Mansf.), pear (Pyrus communis L.), banana (Musa ×paradisiaca L.), kiwifruit (Actinidia deliciosa C.S. Liang & A.R. Ferguson), mango (Mangifera indica L.), and avocado (Persea americana Mill.)] and vegetables (cabbage (Brassica oleracea L. Capitata Group), green pepper (Capsicum annuum L. Grossum Group), iceberg and romaine lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.)). In all of these fruit and vegetables, Fα was able to indicate the presence of low-O2 stress. As the O2 concentration dropped below threshold values of 0 to 1.4 kPa, depending on the product, the Fα value immediately and dramatically increased. At the end of the short-term study, O2 was increased above the threshold level, whereupon Fα returned to approximately prestressed values. A 9-month study was undertaken with `Summerland McIntosh' apple fruit to determine if storing the fruit at 0.9 kPa O2, the estimated low O2 threshold value determined from Fα, would benefit or damage fruit quality, compared with threshold + 0.3 kPa (1.2 kPa O2) and the lowest recommended CA (1.5 kPa O2). After 9 months, the threshold treatment (0.9 kPa) had the highest firmness, lowest concentration of fermentation volatiles (ethanol, acetaldehyde, ethyl acetate) and lowest total disorders. Sensory rating for off-flavor, flavor and preference indicated no discernible differences among the three treatments.

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J.R. Toivonen P.M.A. Practical applications of chlorophyll fluorescence in plant biology Kluwer Acad. Pub Boston, MA Hilhorst, M.A. 2000 A pore water conductivity sensor Soil Sci. Soc. Amer. J. 64 1922 1925 Jones, H.G. 2007 Monitoring plant and soil

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