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( Nicotiana tabacum ), beet ( Beta vulgaris ), and corn ( Zea mays ) pre-treated with ABA demonstrated increased chlorophyll and carotenoid concentrations under water stress. Sorghum ( Sorghum bicolor ) seedlings supplemented with ABA and exposed to light

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the main component of chlorophyll [Chl ( Hák et al., 1993 )]; therefore, estimating the plant N content is important for farmers to determine the amount of N fertilizer needed for optimum nutrient management, especially for apple trees younger than 5

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Abstract

The chlorophyll intensifíer mutations high pigment (hp) and dark green (dg) of tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.) were analyzed for their effects on fruit and vegetative characters. These mutations are nonallelic, and differences between them are primarily quantitative. Both mutations increased Vitamin C content at all stages of fruit development, and more than 90% was present in the reduced form in the mature-green and fully ripe mutant types and in normal fruit. Ascorbate levels in all fruit portions were increased by hp and dg, with the largest increase occurring in the outer pericarp. Chlorophyll in outer pericarp tissue of mutant fruit was increased 166% by hp and 320% by dg. Mutant fruit were smaller and more elongate than isogenic normal controls, but ripening was unaffected by either mutation. Vegetative and reproductive development were retarded by both chlorophyll intensifier mutations. The hp and dg mutations significantly reduced total leaf area, internode length, and whole plant fresh and dry weight, but did not reduce the number of nodes present at a particular stage of development. The effects of dg were always quantitatively greater than for hp. The similarity of effects associated with these 2 nonallelic mutants suggests that pleiotropy rather than close linkage accounts for the multiple effects of these genes.

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Chlorophyll “a” fluorescence (Fvar) was compared with respiration and vitamin C content of broccoli [Brassica oleracea L. (Botrytis group)] during storage at 1C. The amplitude of the Fvar maxima declined in a similar manner as respiration and vitamin C content. Fvar was highly correlated with respiration (r = 0·83, P > = 0·0001). The correlation of Fvar with vitamin C content was weaker (r = 0·42, P > = 0·0002). The results demonstrate that Fvar is an indicator of postharvest changes in broccoli and that Fvar can be used as a nondestructive indicator of early changes in tissue condition (i.e., degree of freshness) of broccoli in storage.

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consequence of starch accumulation in citrus leaves affected by HLB may be an impact on photosynthesis. Light energy absorbed by chlorophyll molecules can be used to drive photosynthesis, dissipated as heat, or re-emitted as light (chlorophyll fluorescence

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1 Prescnt address: Himeji College of Hyogo, Shinzaike-honcho, Himeji, Hyogo 670 Japan. 2 To whom reprint requests should be addressed. Paper no. W of the series “Mechanism of Chlorophyll Degradation in Harvested Leafy Vegetables”. We gratefully

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Three chlorophyll deficiency traits in lettuce (Lactuca sativa) are reported. One, chlorophyll deficient-3 (cd-3), is quite yellow in the seedling stage, and controlled by a single recessive allele. Chlorophyll deficient-4 (cd-4) has sectors of yellow-green and green in the true leaves. It is inherited as a single recessive, and may be allelic to chlorophyll deficient-2 (cd-2). Sickly (si) is stunted, yellow, and partially necrotic, and is also controlled by a single allele. Virescent (vi) is epistatic to cd-4 and the latter is partially lethal. Linkage and additional epistatic relations with previously named chlorophyll deficient genes and other traits are discussed.

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Leaf chlorophyll content is an important index for plant N status, photosynthesis capacity, and stress tolerance ( Taiz et al., 2015 ). It is common to estimate leaf chlorophyll content using nondestructive optical chlorophyll meters ( Ferrarezi

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. Chlorophyll fluorescence and the photochemistry of photosystem II (PSII) can be imaged using cameras, sophisticated data capture techniques, and synchronized light sources ( Baker, 2008 ). Both baseline chlorophyll fluorescence and the Fv/Fm can be imaged and

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well as labor-intensive and time-consuming. More recently, chlorophyll fluorescence analysis has been used to evaluate plant responses to different environmental stresses ( Baker and Rosenqvist, 2004 ; Maxwell and Johnson, 2000 ). Chlorophyll

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