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Brian J. Schutte, Adriana D. Sanchez, Leslie L. Beck, and Omololu John Idowu

In the United States, chile peppers (domesticated species within the Capsicum genus) are primarily produced in California, New Mexico, Arizona, and Texas [U.S. Department of Agriculture, National Agricultural Statistics Service (USDA-NASS), 2020

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Marisa M. Wall, Stephanie Walker, Arthur D. Wall, Ed Hughs, and Richard Phillips

This research was supported by the New Mexico Agricultural Experiment Station, and the New Mexico Chile Pepper Task Force. We thank Steve Lyles for producing the crop; Roy Pennock, Linda Liess and Margery Parossien for technical assistance

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Jack E. McCoy and Paul W. Bosland

Chile peppers ( Capsicum sp.) are a widely cultivated crop that is a staple in the diet of many cultures worldwide and is used as a vegetable, spice, ornamental, and medicinal plant ( Bosland and Votava, 2012 ). There are five domesticated species

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Frank B. Matta and Roy M. Nakayama

Abstract

‘Española Improved’ chile pepper (Capsicum annuum L.) has been released for early production in areas characterized by a short growing season (155 days), relatively cool nights, and mild day temperatures. ‘Española Improved’ is highly adaptable to northerncentral New Mexico. It is suggested for home and commercial production of pungent green and red chile for short growing season areas of New Mexico.

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Genhua Niu, Denise S. Rodriguez, Kevin Crosby, Daniel Leskovar, and John Jifon

users has become intense. Use of alternative water sources such as municipal reclaimed water and other poor-quality, non-potable saline waters for irrigating agricultural crops such as chile peppers may be inevitable in the water scarce southwestern

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Mohammed B. Tahboub, Soumaila Sanogo, Paul W. Bosland, and Leigh Murray

Phytophthora blight, caused by Phytophthora capsici , constitutes a limiting factor to profitable production of many crops worldwide ( Erwin and Ribeiro, 1996 ), including chile pepper ( Sanogo, 2003 , 2004 ; Sanogo and Carpenter, 2006

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Paul W. Bosland, Danise Coon, and Gregory Reeves

Chile peppers ( Capsicum sp.) are cultivated worldwide and are often prized for their heat ( Bosland and Votava, 2012 ). A widely used heat measurement for chile peppers is the SHU ( Scoville, 1912 ). This measurement is the highest dilution of a

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Benigno Villalon, Frank J. Dainello, William N. Lipe, and Richard M. Taylor

Abstract

The major diseases responsible for the decline of profitable pepper (Capsicum annuum L.) production in Texas and other areas throughout the United States and the world have been the potato Y-type viruses (1). ‘TAM Mild Chile-2’ (TMC-2) is the first mildly pungent long green/red chile with multiple virus resistance (MVR) to tobacco etch virus (TEV), potato virus Y (PVY), pepper mottle virus (PeMV), and tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) developed by the Texas Agricultural Experiment Station (TAES). It is recommended as a multi-purpose chile for fresh market, for processing in the green stage, or dehydration into red chile powder. The fruit exhibit a very low pungency and a high concentration of extractable red color.

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Danise Coon, Derek W. Barchenger, and Paul W. Bosland

Chile peppers have been highly regarded as ornamental plants since being introduced to Europe in the 15th century ( Armitage and Hamilton, 1987 ). Chile peppers considered by the horticulture industry to be “ornamental,” are compact plants with

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Asmita Nagila, Brian J. Schutte, Soum Sanogo, and Omololu John Idowu

Chile pepper ( Capsicum annuum ) is an important horticultural crop in New Mexico. In 2018, ≈8400 acres in New Mexico were cultivated with chile pepper, which comprised 46% of total chile pepper acreage in the United States [ U.S. Dept. Agr