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Maintaining medium pH and nutrient concentrations at levels acceptable for growth are important for producing vigorous transplants in the shortest time. Medium chemical properties, such as cation-exchange capacity, aeration, liming materials, preplant fertilizer, irrigation-water sources, water-soluble fertilizers, and plant species, interact to affect medium pH and nutrient management. However, these chemical properties do not affect medium pH or the nutrient supply simultaneously or with equal intensity. The objective of this review is to consider key chemical properties of container media and their affects on pH and nutrient management initially and over time.

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available on the chemical and physical properties of DFB as it pertains to use as a container substrate. Most literature on this subject refers to the chemical properties of soluble components extracted for pulpwood or other industrial chemical purposes

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disadvantages, researchers worldwide are working on optimizing and evaluating biomass conversion processes to improve quality and performance of biomass-based production of fuels, chemicals, and biochar. Specific and unique properties of each biochar product

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chemical properties are improved by organic amendments through their contribution to soil cation exchange capacity, enhancing the ability of soils to buffer pH changes, and cation complexation ( Magdoff, 1992 ; Wallace et al., 1990 ). Soil organic matter

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Proper nutrient management in the root zone is important for maintaining a healthy turf ( Happ, 1995 ). Chemical properties such as pH and cation exchange capacity (CEC) of the root zone influence availability of essential nutrients and impact

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their availability, favorable physical properties, and lack of detrimental chemical constituents ( Handreck and Black, 2002 ). A saleable containerized crop can be produced quickly in bark substrates; however, water and nutrient uptake efficiencies may

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nutritional properties of PTS during crop production have not been investigated; therefore, the objectives of this study were to evaluate substrate solution nutrient concentrations, changes in physical and chemical properties, substrate shrinkage, and

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changes in the chemical properties of bagged potting mixes in storage have been studied. Carlile (2004) warned that in potting mixes containing CRFs, the slow release of the nutrients over time can lead to serious problems stemming from high nutrient

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soils, where mineralization rates are also dependent on the inherent chemical and physical properties of each soil type ( Chae and Tabatabai, 1986 ). Research on the mineralization of N from organic fertilizers in soilless substrates is lacking

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Abstract

This paper describes a system for predicting container mixture physical and chemical properties from component properties. An additive model is presented that assumes that a mixture property is the weighted sum of the properties contributed by the individual components. To test this hypothesis, 24 combinations of sandy loam soil (Typic Xerothent), sand (Typic Xeropsamment), bark, and perlite were tested for bulk density, total and air-filled porosities, container capacity, available water, saturated hydraulic conductivity, pH, and cation exchange capacity. The measured experimental data were compared with values predicted from the additive model. Measured and predicted values were in good agreement for most properties, except saturated hydraulic conductivity and air-filled porosity for mixtures with low total porosity. Application of the same approach also worked well for previously published data.

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