Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 16 items for :

Clear All

This report was motivated by a multiyear discussion with colleagues about the history of fig breeding in California, especially the lineage from caprifig ‘Croisic’ to common fig ‘Tena’. Over time it became clear that several of these individuals

Open Access

corresponding to 51 local common fig accessions, eight local caprifig (male fig) and 11 foreign accessions, and five accessions of unknown origin ( Table 1 ). Table 1. List of analyzed fig accessions maintained as ex situ collection in the Institut

Free access

A study was conducted to identify genotypes present in a Moroccan fig germplasm collection and provide the first database for a reference collection in northern Morocco. In total, 75 fig samples were analyzed using 8 intersimple sequence repeat primers and 6 simple sequence repeat loci. From these samples, we identified 72 fig genotypes. In genetically heterogeneous cultivars, genotypes under the same denomination were distinguished by both molecular markers and pomological traits. Molecular analysis was used to classify the germplasm into 46 well-defined cultivars and 6 caprifig trees. The remaining genotypes were not clearly identified due to three cases of mislabeling and four cases of homonymy. No evidence was found for the occurrence of geographically widespread genotypes.

Free access

either a pleiotropic effect or mutation in a tightly linked gene, the edible fig also displays a suppression of the androecium. Some so-called caprifigs are reported to be edible and have a more succulent fruitlet than typical caprifigs. We do not know of

Free access

The common fig is a gynodioecious woody perennial species with two tree types: the inedible caprifig, which is functionally a male fig that produces syconia with both male and short-styled female flowers, and the female trees that produce syconia

Free access

different morphs: female trees that produce syconia with female flowers that will develop into edible seeded figs (syconia with multiple one-seed fruit or drupelets) and caprifigs that produce syconia with male and female flowers with a shorter style than

Free access

at Figshare ( Frost 2023 ). Fig. 2. Statistical summary of cultivar types, crop seasons, and attributes extracted for this study. Sexual types: C = Common; Cp = Caprifig; S = Smyrna; Sp = San Pedro. Attributes by category Tree. Sex

Open Access

. Parentage ‘Tiger’ was selected from a group of seedlings from a cross of ‘Celeste’ and ‘C1’. ‘C1’ is a designation given a caprifig obtained from the University of California at Riverside in ≈1950. The cross was made in 1957 and the selection made by Ed O

Free access

. Parentage ‘Champagne’ is a selection from a group of seedlings derived from a cross of ‘Celeste’ × ‘C1’. ‘C1’ is a designation given a caprifig obtained from the University of California at Riverside in ≈1950. The cross was made in 1955 and the selection

Free access

selected from a group of seedlings from a cross of ‘Celeste’ × ‘C1’. ‘C1’ is a designation given a caprifig obtained from the University of California at Riverside in ≈1950. The cross was made in 1956 and an individual plant selection made by E.N. O

Free access