Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 29 items for :

  • brine quality x
Clear All

Gibberellic acid-treated `Napoleon' sweet cherry (Prunus avium L.) fruit were firmer but lost more weight during brining than nontreated fruit. GA treatment delayed fruit softening, thereby extending the harvest period. Mean fruit weight was increased by GA only in fruit harvested at a more mature state. GA delayed soluble solids accumulation in one of two years. In one orchard district, solution pockets were less frequent in GA -treated fruit in 1988 and in late-harvested GA -treated fruit in 1989. GA treatment did not alter the incidence of fruit with solution pockets in a second district in 1988 and increased levels of solution pockets in fruit harvested later in 1989. Incidence of fruit with solution pockets increased as maturity progressed in nontreated fruit in both years and both districts. Chemical name used: gibberellic acid (G A).

Free access
Authors: and

Abstract

The correlation between each of the green fruit characters: carpel separation, firmness, and skin toughness with balloon bloating in salt stock was significant. As percentage of carpel separation increased the percentage of balloon bloating increased. As fruit firmness and skin toughness increased the percentage of balloon bloaters decreased. Firmness and skin toughness measurements on green fruit were significantly correlated with the same measurements on brine stock.

There was no significant correlation between lens bloating and any one of the three green fruit characters. The multiple correlation coefficient between carpel separation, fruit firmness, and lens bloating was significant. The regression equation of Ȳ = −1.21A −8.42B + 248.79 is useable in predicting lens bloating where A is percent carpel separation and B is firmness of green fruit. The estimate of lens bloating from use of this equation was just as reliable as the equation using all three green fruit characters.

Open Access

nutrition can affect vegetable external and postharvest quality ( Locascio et al., 1984 ). However, little is known about the effect of N fertility on brine quality of cucumbers, although nearly all processing cucumbers in North America are brined. Nitrogen

Free access

Abstract

Flotation of raw baby lima beans (Phaseolus lunatus L.) in salt brines and flotation combined with sieve sizing were found to be reliable methods of segregating such beans into quality classes for evaluation and grading. The shearpress gave only a general indication of the over-all quality of a lot, since it did not facilitate segregation of individual beans.

Open Access

Abstract

Cucumber (cucumis sativus L.) hybrids from crosses with 3 female (gynoecious) parents and 2 genetically similar male parents were evaluated at 3 locations to determine if bisexual (phenotypically andromonoecious) parents can be used in hybrid cultivars with no loss in yield or quality. Bisexual parents developed through 8 backcrosses to recurrent gynoecious lines produced hybrids that could not be distinguished from those obtained by using silver nitrate-induced, near-isogenic gynoecious pollen parents. Yield, fruit shape, defects, brining quality, and sex expression of hybrids from the 2 near-isogenic pollen parents were not significantly different. Deficiencies generally attributed to bisexual parents were corrected with adequate backcrossing to establishing bisexual lines.

Open Access

Abstract

Irrigation method and row spacing had a significant influence on the quality of fresh, canned, and frozen snap beans (Phaseolus vulgaris L.). Sprinkle irrigated fresh and canned snap beans contained more ascorbic acid than rill irrigated snap beans. Rill irrigated snap beans had more intense color, lower shear values, less turbid brine, and less drained weight loss. Canned snap beans grown in narrow rows had less drained weight loss than snap beans from wide rows. Frozen snap beans from narrow rows had more drip loss, less moisture, increased soluble solids, and increased ascorbic acid content than those from wide rows. Under the conditions of this study, rill irrigated snap beans and snap beans grown in narrow rows did have quality advantages over sprinkle irrigated snap beans and snap beans grown in wide rows.

Open Access
Author:

Jalapeños are versatile peppers with both green and mature-red peppers used fresh and in processed products. Peppers can be dried, pickled whole in brine or as salted mash for sauces. Mature fruit can also be smoked and dried to produce chipotle which can be used in several ways including preparation of sauces. Although there are many individual cultivars of jalapeño peppers available, little is known of their processing characteristics. Most food processors still rely on fresh-market supplies rather than contracting specific cultivars which might provide better processing characteristics. A study was begun in Summer 2005 at LSU to provide information concerning the processing characteristics of commonly available jalapeño cultivars. Over a 3-year period, each cultivar will be evaluated in fresh form, as pickled whole fruit, as salted mash and as smoked chipotle. Besides good cultural production qualities, pepper cultivars that will be manufactured into processed products should have 1) acceptable and consistent heat content, 2) good stable color and, 3) consistent/suitable size (for whole pack). Seventeen jalapeño cultivars were evaluated in fresh green, brine-cured green and mature-red state for fruit surface color, average fruit weight, dry weight, and percent seed.

Free access

An `intermediate leaf' hybrid pickling cucumber (TAMU 884304 X ARK H-19 `little leaf') was direct-seeded at four plant densities (94,570; 48,440; 32,290; 25,375 plants/ha) using four within-row spacings (15, 30, 45, 60cm) at two locations and two seasons. Optimum yield based on marketable fruit number, grade distribution and fruit quality occurred with 94,570 plants/ha. Optimum harvest time depended on location and season. Delayed harvest times were also evaluated. Harvests with fruit >5.1cm in diameter had severely reduced brining quality. Fruit did not enlarge or enlarged slowly to oversize. This resulted in a mixture of fruit ages within the largest marketable fruit grades. It is recommended that `little leaf' lines and their hybrids such as `intermediate leaf' be harvested when fruit 3.8 to 5.1cm in diameter appear and before oversize fruit are produced. Spacing did not significantly effect length/diameter ratio(LDR) but LDR was significantly greater for delayed harvests.

Free access

Abstract

Experiments were conducted during 1981 and 1982 to determine the yield and quality responses of lima bean (Phaseolus lunatus L.) cultivars to air temperatures preceding harvest. Temperature conditions and cultivars that produced large lima bean plants at blossom increased seed yields. Quality parameters of seeds after separation into maturity groups by salt brine were influenced by cultivars and air temperatures. Sugar content, green color intensity, and chlorophyll content decreased as seeds matured. Sugar contents of ‘Nemagreen’, ‘Bridgeton’, and ‘Thorogreen’ were greater than ‘Kingston’ at comparable stages of maturity. Sugar content increased when air temperatures during the period of 0–7 days preceding harvest were high. Air temperatures were most closely related to sugar content of mature seeds. Chlorophyll content was closely correlated with tristimulus chlorimeter – a value. The chlorophyll contents at all maturities were reduced by high air temperatures preceding harvest. The average temperature during the period of 7–14 days before harvest had the greatest influence on the chlorophyll content. The influence of air temperatures on chlorophyll content during this period was 3 to 4 times greater for immature (25% total solids) than for mature (35% total solids) seeds, and minimum air temperatures were more closely correlated with chlorophyll contents than were maximum air temperatures. These results indicate that quality (intensity of green color) was affected more by high air temperatures than was seed yield. Chlorophyll contents were more closely related to minimum than to maximum air temperatures, indicating that the effect of high temperature would be increased in humid areas where night temperatures are high.

Open Access
Author:

A study was initiated in the 1997-98 production season to evaluate the effects of salinity on grapefruit yield and fruit quality in the Indian River area of Florida. The experiment was conducted on `Ray Ruby' grapefruit (Citrus paradisi) planted in 1990 on `Carrizo' citrange (C. sinensis × Poncirus trifoliata) and `Swingle' citrumelo (C. paradisi × P. trifoliata) rootstocks. Trees were planted on 15.2-m-wide (50 ft) double-row beds at a spacing of 4.6 m (15 ft) in-row × 7.3 m (24 ft) across-row [286.6 trees/ha (116 trees/acre)]. The control treatment was irrigated via microsprinkler emitters with water from a surficial aquifer well with an electrical conductivity (EC) of 0.7 dS·m-1. Higher irrigation water salinity levels were achieved by injecting a sea water brine mixture into the supply water to achieve ECs of 2.3, 3.9, and 5.5 dS·m-1. A wide range of rainfall and irrigation conditions occurred during the years encompassed by these studies, with rain totaling 1262, 1294, 1462, and 964 mm (49.7, 50.9, 57.6, and 38.0 inches) for 1997, 1998, 1999, and 2000, respectively. Salinity level had little effect on internal juice quality parameters [total soluble solids (TSS), acid, or juice content] at time of harvest. One of the most visible effects of irrigation with high salinity water was the damage to leaves, with leaf chloride (Cl) levels increasing about 0.14% for each 1.0 dS·m-1 increase in EC of the irrigation water for trees on `Carrizo' citrange and 0.02% for trees on `Swingle' citrumelo. For both rootstocks, the number of fruit and the size of the fruit decreased with increasing salinity in the irrigation water. The non-salinized trees had significantly larger fruit compared to the rest of the treatments. In the very dry 2000-01 season, trees on `Carrizo' irrigated with 0.7 dS·m-1 water had about 50% more fruit size 36 [fruit count per 0.028-m3 (4/5 bu) carton] or larger than trees watered with 3.9 or 5.5 dS·m-1 water. For trees on `Swingle' rootstock, trees irrigated with 0.7 dS·m-1 water had 150% to 200% more size 36 and larger fruit than trees watered with 2.3 dS·m-1 water. Over the four seasons, average yields for `Carrizo' were reduced 3200.0 kg·ha-1 (2855 lb/acre) per year for each 1.0 dS·m-1 increase in EC of the irrigation water. For `Swingle' rootstock, the reduction was 2600.3 kg·ha-1 (2320 lb/acre) per year for each 1.0 dS·m-1 increase in EC of the irrigation water. These reductions averaged 7% (`Swingle') and 6% (`Carrizo') for each 1.0 dS·m-1 increase in salinity of the irrigation water.

Full access