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Annie R. Vogel, Rachael S. White, Clark MacAllister, and Cain C. Hickey

crop loss due to rot. Botrytis bunch rot ( Botrytis cinerea ) severity and incidence measurements were quantified on three occasions: once after start of veraison, once at an intermediate date between version and harvest, and once again immediately

Open access

Katherine Bennett, Mary Vargo, Guido Schnabel, and James E. Faust

Botrytis cinerea is a ubiquitous plant pathogen that infects bedding plants during greenhouse production, resulting in latent infections that appear in the postharvest shipping environment. On arrival at the retail location, petunias frequently

Open access

Rachel P. Naegele

Botrytis cinerea is a generalist nectrophic fungus capable of infecting more than 200 species of plants ( Droby and Lichter, 2007 ). In Vitis spp., B. cinerea can incite bunch rot, also known as gray mold, in addition to cane and leaf spot

Open access

Katherine Bennett, Jared Jent, Uttara C. Samarakoon, Guido Schnabel, and James E. Faust

Botrytis cinerea , the causal agent of botrytis blight, is a ubiquitous plant pathogen that infects more than 200 crop species worldwide. Although there are fungicides available for botrytis blight management, many chemical classes have low efficacy

Open access

Ravi Bika, Cristi Palmer, Lisa Alexander, and Fulya Baysal-Gurel

Botrytis cinerea ( Baysal-Gurel et al., 2016 ). Botrytis blight disease reduces the ornamental quality of cut flowers, which makes them unsalable and represents a huge economic burden to growers. This opportunistic fungus has a devastating impact in both

Free access

Timothy W. Coolong, Ronald R. Walcott, and William M. Randle

years ( Tietjen and Ceponis, 1981 ; Williams-Woodward, 2001 ). Five Botrytis species have been linked to neck rot in onion ( Yohalem et al., 2003 ). Three species, however, are considered exclusively associated with symptoms of neck rot in onion

Full access

Yuee Tian, Zhiping Che, Di Sun, Yuanyuan Yang, Xiaomin Lin, Shengming Liu, Xiaoyu Liu, and Jie Gao

present, more than 20 kinds of fungal diseases of peony have been reported, of which gray mold caused by Botrytis cinerea is an increasingly severe disease with a high frequency of occurrence ( Yang et al., 2017 ). The pathogen can cause necrotic leaves

Free access

Kimberly H. Krahl and William M. Randle

Botrytis diseases are the most common and among the most destructive diseases affecting greenhouse-grown crops. Presently a combination of cultural control and fungicidal sprays are used to control the disease. Increasing energy and labor costs plus evidence of resistance of B. cinerea strains to commonly used fungicides has made the disease more difficult to control. A source of genetic resistance would provide an additional powerful and stable tool to control the incidence of Botrytis disease.

In this study screening techniques for Botrytis resistance in petunia were developed and 40 petunia genotypes were screened for resistance to B. cinerea. A wide range of variability for resistance to B. cinerea was discovered in petunia. Results indicate the presence of useful quantitative-type resistance to B. cinerea in petunia.

Free access

Julia M. Harshman, Wayne M. Jurick II, Kim S. Lewers, Shiow Y. Wang, and Christopher S. Walsh

Raspberries ( Rubus sp.) are the third most popular berry in the United States ( Geisler, 2012 ) and a growing specialty crop for both the wholesale industry and smaller, local markets, and U-pick. Postharvest susceptibility to gray mold ( Botrytis

Free access

Kimberly H. Krahl and William M. Randle

Although Petunia hybrida Vilm., a major bedding plant, is susceptible to many diseases, no formal disease resistance studies have been conducted. Botrytis cinerea Pers. ex Fr. is a ubiquitous pathogen, causing great damage to greenhouse-grown ornamental crops, including petunia. In this study, a screening procedure for B. cinerea resistance in petunia was developed and 48 diverse petunia phenotypes were screened for resistance to B. cinerea in two seasons, spring and fall. The range of variability for resistance to B. cinerea in petunia was wide and continuous. Spearman's rank correlation coefficients between seasons were significant and moderate. While the majority of phenotypes displayed less than a 10% difference in mean percent infection in spring vs. fall seasons, several phenotypes displayed large differences that require further testing. One cultivar, `Pink Sensation Improved', exhibited low and consistent mean percent infection in both spring and fall and, therefore, may be a useful source of resistance to B. cinerea in petunia.