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Susan M. Boyetchko

49 COLLOQUIUM 2 (Abstr. 006–011) Biological Control Approaches for Successful Stand Establishment

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Laura Pickett Pottorff and Karen L. Panter

, literature on the efficacy of IPM and biological control in high tunnels is limited. This article provides a selective overview of IPM measures that have proven efficacious in greenhouse and high tunnel production, or are likely to perform well in high

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M.L. Matheny

49 COLLOQUIUM 2 (Abstr. 006–011) Biological Control Approaches for Successful Stand Establishment

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Touria El-Jaoual

Biological Control of Plant Diseases. S.B. Chincholkar and K.G. Mukerji (eds.). 2007. The Haworth Press, Inc., Binghamton, NY. 426 pp. plus index; 17 tables and 26 black-and-white photographs and illustrations; 6-inch × 8.35-inch format. ISBN

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B.H. Ownley and D.M. Benson

Abbreviations: PB, pine bark. 1 Former Graduate Research Assistant. Current address: USDA-ARS, Root Disease and Biological Control Research Unit, 367 Johnson Hall, Washington State Univ., Pullman, WA 99164-6430. 2 Professor. This research was

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Charles S. Vavrina, N. Kokalis Burrell and J. Kloepper

30 Workshop 1 (Abstr. 653–655) Efficacy of Biological Controls for Enhancement of Stand Establishment

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Kiffnie M. Holt, George Opit, James R. Nechols, David C. Margolies and Kimberly A. Williams

inhabit the underside of leaves, they can go undetected until populations are already causing damage. Therefore, growers traditionally rely on preventative applications of miticides to avoid TSM problems. Biological control offers an alternative for

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Anthony J. D'Angelo and James Quinn

A strategy for controlling pests with biological control was sought for production of salad greens and herbs in a nutrient film technique (NFT) growing system. A case study was initiated in October 1989 using a one half hectare greenhouse range (1988 construction) with no past or present synthetic insecticide use. Problematic pests were aphids and thrips. A natural predator/pest cycle (NPC) area was established (5% of total greenhouse area with potted herbs on benches) to provide an area for predators to establish and reproduce. Introduced predators, which successfully reproduced in the greenhouse, were Apidoletes aphidimyza (aphid control), Amblyseius macKenzie, and A. cucumeris (thrip control), Encarsia formosa (whitefly control), and Phyoseiulus persimilus (two spotted spider mite control), Naturally occuring predators of importance included a wasp parasitoid of aphids (Hymenoptera) and an insect predator, the minute pirate bug (Hemipters, Anthocoridae), which feeds on thrips and aphids.

Two flying predators of aphids (A. aphidimyza and the wasp parasitoid) dispersed well from the NPC area and provided effective control. The technique of applying the thrips predators, a slow moving mite to flats shortly before transplanting provided good dispersal on all transplants. The time for effective control by the predator was 4 to 6 weeks. Effective control was observed in chives but not shorter cycle crops (3 to 5 weeks average). Immature minute pirate bugs were also observed in the chives assisting in control. Effective spider mite control was accomplished 2 to 3 weeks after the release of P. persimills into infested area. Whitefly populations have been effectively controlled by E. formosa.

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Margaret T. Mmbaga, Lucas M. Mackasmiel and Frank A. Mrema

suppress other fungal pathogens including root rot pathogens ( Mmbaga et al., 2016 ). The objectives of this study were to 1) evaluate the efficiency of six previously selected microbial isolates (B17A, B17B, F13, F16, Y4, and Y14) as biological control

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Heidi M. Wollaeger, Kristin L. Getter and Bridget K. Behe

edible crops (24%) and non-edible crops (13.5%). In a separate study, consumers were willing to spend up to $485 annually for the protection of eucalyptus species in the landscape with biological control pest management practices from the eucalyptus snout