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Harbans L. Bhardwaj and Anwar A. Hamama

characterization of canola sprouts is based on four cultivars that were common to National Canola Trials during 2001 to 2002 and 2002 to 2003 crop seasons (‘Banjo’, ‘KS8200’, ‘KS8227’, and ‘Virginia’). We had initially studied sprouts made from the 10 highest

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Harbans L. Bhardwaj and Anwar A. Hamama

to those in sprouts of alfalfa, brussels sprout, mungbean, and radish based on literature values for these crops. Given that there is a lack of fatty acid profile of canola sprouts in the literature, we are now reporting the contents of various fatty

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Jin Cui, Juanxu Liu, Jianjun Chen, and Richard J. Henny

regulators. Table 2. Frequency of callus formation from sprouted seed explants of Chlorophytum amaniense ‘Fire Flash’ after 8-week culture on a Murashige and Skoog basal medium z containing different concentrations of growth regulators under a photon flux

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Aekaterini N. Martini, Maria Papafotiou, and Stavros N. Vemmos

explants from each stem location (apical, top, middle, base) and origin (adult plants, sprouts, micropropagated plantlets) were collected during April to May, June to July, and November, indicative of the periods when explants exhibited intense, low, and

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Ji-Yu Zhang, Zhong-Ren Guo, Rui Zhang, Yong-Rong Li, Lin Cao, You-Wang Liang, and Li-Bin Huang

-old seedlings. The rootstocks were pruned ≈2 cm above the patch bud in Feb. 2014 while the trees were dormant. The pruned rootstock tops were used as hardwood cuttings. Hardwood cutting. Hardwood cuttings collected from the basal portion of the pruned rootstock

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Yaser Hassan Dewir, Abdullah Alsadon, Abdullah Ibrahim, and Mohammed El-Mahrouk

pr oductivity ( Devi et al., 2011 ). In addition, low saffron yield is partly the result of application of conventional agronomic practices ( Koul, 1999 ). Cultivation systems based on controlled conditions can be a suitable replacement for

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Arthur O. Villordon and Don R. La Bonte

Our research compared the extent of genomic variability between plants originating from adventitious sprouts and nodal cultures. Plant materials, derived from a single sprout and originating from a storage root each of `Jewel,' `Sumor,' and L87-95, were clonally propagated for seven generations nodally and through adventitious sprouts. PCR-based analysis using 15 random primers identified 58 scorable molecular markers, 37 (63.79%) of which were shared by all three genotypes represented by 60 samples (10 nodal and 10 adventitiously derived plants/genotype). Of 29 putatively polymorphic markers, 24 (82.75%) were putative polymorphisms across the entire data set. The remaining four (13.79%) represented putatively fixed genotypic differences that were monomorphic within genotypes. A multidimensional scaling analysis differentiated seven (23.33%) adventitiously derived phenotypic marker variants, compared to four (13.33%) among nodal materials. Our results support previous findings that, relative to nonmeristematic tissues, meristematic regions strictly control cell division and DNA synthesis that exclude DNA duplication and other irregularities.

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J. W. Van Sambeek, Lisa J. Lambus, and John E. Preece

At monthly intervals for 1 year, one branch was removed from the lower crown of three 30-year-old trees of black walnut (Juglans nigra L.). The basal 1.3 m of each branch was cut into four 32-cm-long segments that were placed horizontally in shallow plastic trays filled with perlite and watered daily with tap water. Branch segments cut early in the dormant season (29 Sept., 31 Oct., or 1 Dec.) or shortly after flushing (6 June) produced few, if any, epicormic sprouts. Approximately half the branch segments cut on 3 Jan. or 3 Feb. produced one sprout that elongated slowly. Most branch segments cut in the late dormant season (2 Mar., 30 Mar., 3 May) or growing season (5 July, 4 Aug., 6 Sept.) produced one or two sprouts >20 mm long. To prepare explants for in vitro culture, the terminal 2.5 cm was harvested when sprouts exceeded 3.0 cm, trimmed of all leaves, and disinfested. Explants were placed vertically in liquid Long & Preece (LP) medium supplemented with 3% sucrose, 0.3 μM TDZ, 0.05 μM IBA, and 1 μM BA. When shoots began to elongate (4 to 6 weeks), they were then placed horizontally on agar-solidified LP medium with liquid LP overlays to induce axillary shoot proliferation. Advantages of forcing epicormic sprouts on large branch segments are: 1) they can be a source of in vitro explant material for 6 to 7 months a year, 2) aseptic cultures can be easily obtained, 3) shoots from the base of branches may show more juvenility than shoots forced from branch tips, 4) softwood shoot wilting is not a problem as with forcing shoots from branch tips, 5) the procedure does not require preparing and changing forcing solutions, and 6) branch segments should have more stored food than dormant branch tips for forcing softwood growth.

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Arthur Q. Villordon and Don R. LaBonte

Our research examined whether plants originating from adventitious sprouts from fleshy sweetpotato roots are genetically more variable than plants that arise from pre-existing meristematic regions, i.e., nodes. Our study compared one plant each of `Jewel', `Sumor', and L87-95 clonally propagated for seven generations both nodally and through adventitious sprouts. PCR-based analysis of 60 samples (10 nodal and 10 adventitiously derived plants/genotype) showed 20% polymorphism among adventitious materials vs. 6% among nodally derived plants. An “analysis of molecular variance” showed that differences between propagation methods accounted for 30% of the total marker variability. Our results support previous findings that, relative to non-meristematic materials, meristematic regions strictly control cell division and DNA synthesis that exclude DNA duplication and other irregularities.

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Harbans L. Bhardwaj and Anwar A. Hamama

mg/100 g, respectively) as compared with the other two cultivars (Banjo and Virginia). Based on overall mineral contents, we concluded that sprouts made from seeds of Virginia cultivar produced most nutritional sprouts because it was ranked number one