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Bacterial spot of pumpkin, incited by X. cucurbitae (ex Bryan) Vauterin et al. (1995) [syn. Xanthomonas campestris (Pammel) Dowson pv. c ucurbitae (Bryan) Dye], has become one of the most important diseases of pumpkin [ Cucurbita pepo L. and

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Bacterial spot is a major disease of tomato ( Solanum lycopersicum ) in Florida and worldwide ( Jones, 1991 ; Jones et al., 2004 ). The disease is associated with four species of Xanthomonas : X. euvesicatoria , X. vesicatoria , X. perforans

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in tomato. Florida accounted for nearly 40% of the total U.S. gross sales ( USDA, 2010 ). Among the many diseases that affect tomato, bacterial spot is one of the most troublesome ( Bouzar et al., 1999 ; Jones et al., 2004 ; O'Garro and Charlemagne

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Bacterial spot of tomato ( Solanum lycopersicum L.) was first identified in South Africa ( Doidge, 1921 ). Originally, bacterial spot was thought to be caused by only one species, Xanthomonas campestris pv. vesicatoria ( Stall et al., 1994

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Bacterial leaf spot of lettuce ( Lactuca sativa L.), caused by Xanthomonas campestris pv. vitians , is an economically important disease of lettuce in the world ( Barak et al., 2001 ; Patterson et al., 1986 ; Pennisi and Pane, 1990 ; Sahin

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Bacterial leaf spot disease of anthurium ( Anthurium andraeanum L.) caused by A . anthurii ( Gardan et al., 2000 ) was first reported in the French West Indies ( Prior and Rott, 1989 ; Prior and Sunder, 1987 ; Prior et al., 1985 ) and later in

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, was considered adequate to estimate bacterial disease severity in peach, and can be used in epidemiological studies. Fig. 2. Diagrammatic representation of the bacterial leaf spot (BLS) severity scale developed Citadin et al. (2008) . Values are

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Abstract

A newly described bacterial disease of ‘Honey Dew’ melons is caused by a strain of Erwinia herbicola. The disease first was found on ‘Honey Dew’ melons imported from Ecuador, and subsequently on melons from Guatemala, Venezuela, and California. The disease produces firm, tan to brown, slowly developing lesions that principally affect the rind tissue. The bacterium isolated from a California ‘Honey Dew’ melon was much more virulent and potentially more damaging than isolates from the other sources. We propose bacterial brown spot as the name of the disease.

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Bacterial spot of tomato is caused by as many as four species of Xanthomonas : X. euvesicatoria , X. vesicatoria , X. perforans , and X. gardneri ( Jones et al., 2000 , 2005 ); the former three species were previously named X. campestris

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Abstract

All possible crosses, excluding reciprocals, among 3 bacterial-spot-resistant plant introductions of pepper and the susceptible ‘Yolo Wonder’ were evaluated for resistance in the F3 along with the backcross (BC) F2s derived from backcrosses to the susceptible cultivar. PI 322719 carries a single dominant gene for resistance that is independent of the one carried by PI 163192. The resistance of PI 163189 is more complex; it is independent of the resistance of PI 322719 but may be associated with that of PI 163192. Nonsegregating, resistant families were recovered in the F3s of all crosses and backcrosses.

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