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.6% (n = 10) did not complete their degrees. Eighty percent of KSU horticulture majors connected to horticulture CDE participation over 18 years were successful in KSU’s baccalaureate horticulture program; this observation provides evidence high school

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Abstract

The topic “non-baccalaureate programs” has received increasing attention during the past year. The September 1968 issue of the Journal of the National Association of Colleges and Teachers of Agriculture features papers on this subject. The committee on Less-Than-Baccalaureate Degree Programs in Agriculture sponsored by RICOP issued proceedings of an October 1968 conference held at Pennsylvania State University entitled A National Conference for Less-Than-Baccalaureate Degree Programs in Agriculture. Interest in these programs reflects the need of the agricultural industry for the services of graduates at this level.

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The broad interest of the American public in the planting, growing, and maintenance of ornamental plants has increased the demands on Horticulture teaching throughout the nation. This clamor for more education and training in Horticulture prompted the Education Committee to develop a Symposium on Non-baccalaureate and Baccalaureate Programs in Horticultural Education. A balanced, well-rounded Symposium resulted and is based on the increased emphasis, not only on undergraduate education for the BS degree, but also on non-baccalaureate training in community colleges, vocational institutes, high schools, and short-courses.

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Several recent reports have been critical of the quality of general education in the United States (Assn, of American Colleges, 1985; Geiger, 1980; Schwerin, 1983). Baccalaureate education has not been spared from negative evaluation (Boyer, 1987). A report of the Assn, of American Colleges (1985) stated that the bachelor’s degree had lost its intrinsic value: undergraduate education was being dominated by a marketplace philosophy and universities were not promoting rigorous thinking.

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As the landscape design/build industry continues to develop, opportunities for providing baccalaureate degree programs in landscape contracting increase. Employers seek individuals with competencies that are not adequately addressed by traditional horticulture or landscape architecture curricula. The Department of Horticulture at Penn State has developed a Bachelor of Science in Landscape Contracting degree. The program, now entering its fourth year of resident instruction, has experienced rapid growth and a high degree of success. Annual increases in student interest and demand have necessitated caps on the number of students entering the major. An emphasis on design process and on construction technology, and a requirement for successful completion of courses in Horticulture and allied departments contribute to an education which instructs students in the art, science, and management of a professional design/build business. Integration of computer-aided design into Landscape Contracting courses positions graduates to carry current technology to the industry. Students obtain skills on the use of AutoCAD, LandCADD, and New Image software.

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Many undergraduates major in horticulture because they love working with plants. When they hear research that documents how people respond-to plants, some students -begin to understand why they have responded positively to plants, and they want to learn more about the topic. This paper 1) discusses the potential to use students' excitement about human issues in horticulture to teach principles that educators consider important components of a baccalaureate degree, and 2) presents the case of one student to demonstrate how it can be done.

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The Ohio State Univ.'s Agricultural Technical Institute is a 2-year institution within the College of Food, Agricultural and Environmental Sciences. For over 20 years the school on the Wooster campus has offered technical programs in ornamental horticulture and floriculture leading to the Associate of Applied Science degree. Enrollment in the programs of Floral Design and Marketing, Greenhouse Management, Landscape Contracting, and Construction, Nursery Management, and Turfgrass Management is near 350 students. During the past year, a new program was developed with the primary purpose of serving those students who wish to transfer into a baccalaureate program within the college. Students are granted an Associate of Science degree in Horticulture upon completion of the curriculum requirements at the technical college. Those following this track have a unique opportunity for exposure to two different learning situations. They can progress toward their goal without loss of credit. The curriculum allows students to explore several areas of horticulture before commitment to their specialty. Beginning students have the advantage of a small campus with an active learning assistance program.

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Clemson University and Horry-Georgetown Technical College are using communications technology and non-traditional strategies to offer university horticulture education opportunities to a much larger and more diverse student clientele than is currently served by the traditional campus. This pilot project focuses on delivery of a complete Clemson horticulture/turfgrass science baccalaureate degree program through the technical campus. This partnership was selected for the pilot project, in part, because of the strong commitment to turfgrass related educational programs at each school. Faculties and administrators worked together to remove “campus-bound education” barriers and develop alternate degree pathways. A critical component of this pathway is the offering of select courses through Clemson TELECAMPUS, which delivers live, interactive instruction throughout South Carolina via the South Carolina Educational Television system. The Clemson University Forestry and Agriculture Network (CUFAN) will be used to further enhance interactive opportunities between students and instructors, and to access university support facilities. Additional campus services and resources will be focused to provide an innovative and enriched distance learning opportunity.

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study panel members identifying competencies with a U.S. horticulture baccalaureate degree. Table 2. Delphi study topic area, round of acceptance, competency description, and percentage of acceptance after three rounds of panel members' surveys to

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original research or creative work, write a senior thesis, enroll in UNIV401 and 402, and successfully defend the work before a committee of university faculty. The term “distinction” is included in a baccalaureate degree title. Students who complete an

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