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Kentucky is one of seven states in the southeast evaluating 13 Asian pear cultivars for suitability to the region. The cultivars were planted on a (20′ × 10′) spacing in 1989 at three separate locations. Data on time of bloom, tree growth, fire blight susceptibility and fruit quality and yield were collected. This study demonstrates the variability seen in Asian pear cultivars in response to site. There was a significant site by cultivar interaction for fire blight. The Princeton site had significantly more fire blight than either Lexington or Quicksand. Four cultivars, Niitaka, Shin Li, Shinko and Shinseiki had low fire blight ratings which were not significantly different between the three sites. Asian pear growth rates were significantly different between the three sites, but cultivar growth rates were not. Tree growth rate showed a significant negative correlation to fire blight rating. That is infected trees did not grow much. Initial findings show Shinko, Shinseiki and Niitaka to have some tolerance to fire blight spread and to produce good yields of attractive fruit. However, Niitaka had a very tough skin with a tendency towards fruit cracking. The cultivar Shin Li which also had fire blight tolerance did not produce fruit or flowers.

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of many other asian pear cultivars survived. Field evaluation of tree survival following hail-induced trauma blight at Keedysville. The relative field tolerance of 18 asian pear cultivars following trauma blight induced by a hail storm in 1994 is

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. Asian pear and quince cultivar evaluation. Five asian pears on OH × F rootstock and five cultivars of quince on Quince A rootstock were obtained from Orange County Nursery (Orange County, CA) and planted at 2.4 × 4.9 m spacing in Spring 2002. Trees were

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temperate zones. The attributes that constitute good quality in one species may differ from that in another, as is the case with European and Asian pears. The attributes of European pears, for example, include its soft buttery texture, whereas those of Asian

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the other (n = 112) evaluating late-season pears. In both groups, the study included traditional and novel cultivars, with varying levels of sensory attributes. We investigated how the sensory qualities of the pears, along with the sociodemographic

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central Asia ( Rubstov, 1944 ). Most cultivated pears are assigned to four species: P. pyrifolia , P. ussuriensis , P. × sinkiangensis , and P. communis ( Teng et al., 2002 ). The former three species are oriental pears; the last one is an occidental

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‘Akizuki’ ( Pyrus pyrifolia Nakai), a Japanese pear, plays an important role in pear production in China because of its good quality characteristics such as large fruit, pretty shape, delicate pulp. and high soluble solid content. However, with the

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Methods Sixteen interspecific backcross hybrid breeding selections from the pear breeding programs of Purdue University, Rutgers University, the University of Illinois, and Cornell University were evaluated for fruit quality traits. The selections were

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Taiwan. The farmers invented unique top-working cultivation ( Lin et al., 1990 ) to produce high-quality pear fruits by grafting flower bud-containing pear scions imported from Japan onto the local dominant low-chilling required cultivar, P . pyrifolia

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ranks fourth among fruit-tree crops after citrus, apple, and grape production. Pear breeding in Japan started in the early 20th century ( Machida, 1979 ), with fruit quality improvement being the most important objective of breeding programs. Important

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