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The evergreen Ceanothus velutinus and semi-evergreen C. fendleri are native Colorado, drought-tolerant shrubs. They are of interest for landscaping and rock gardens, but have poor seed germination as well as vary considerably in growth form and habit. Asexual propagation methods would be important for commercial development of these species. Basal hardwood cuttings of C. velutinus were rooted using four different concentrations of IBA. The highest concentration of IBA (0.8%) showed the highest rooting (14.8%), while the average number of roots per cutting was highest for 0.1%. Ceanothus fendleri shoot tips were cultured on MS medium with four BA (0.89, 4.4, 8.9 and 17.8 μM) and three 2ip concentrations (24.6, 49.0 and 73.6 μM). After nine weeks an average of six shoots were produced in treatments having 4.9 μM of BA. Lower concentrations of BA up to 9.8 μM were better than higher concentrations of BA or 2ip. There was a tendency for production of callus at the higher levels of 8A and all levels of 2ip.

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Abstract

The response of cape primrose (Streptocarpus) plants to external N application is dependent on growth media only in terms of response magnitude. A 2.0% to 2.9% tissue N level in either sand or bark media maximized shoot dry weight, the number of potential flowers, and the quantity and quality of plantlets regenerated during subsequent asexual propagation. In sand, 2.9% tissue N was below the level required for maximum leaf elongation and resulted in a desirable restriction of the primary leaf (phyllomorph). Tissue N levels that either exceeded or lagged behind the optima were often detrimental to plant aesthetics, and wasteful where luxuriant tissue levels did not affect the measured characteristics.

Open Access

The `Desert Museum' hybrid between the Blue, Foothills, and Mexican palo verdes has been well received by the public. However, it has remained unavailable due to difficulties in asexual propagation. Studies were conducted on effects of IBA cone. (0 to 10,000 ppm), cutting position along the stem, size of cutting, season, and temperature of the medium.

For `Desert Museum', basal cuttings of slightly hardened new stem growth rooted much better than apical cuttings. Best rooting for apical cuttings was 79% using IBA from 2,500-5,000 ppm. Basal cuttings averaged 95% rooting and showed no response to IBA. Rooting of cuttings taken in September declined to 10% for apical and 2170 for basal cuttings averaged over all IBA levels. Six other species or hybrids of Cercidium and Parkinsonia and five of Prosopis were also rooted.

Free access

The `Desert Museum' hybrid between the Blue, Foothills, and Mexican palo verdes has been well received by the public. However, it has remained unavailable due to difficulties in asexual propagation. Studies were conducted on effects of IBA cone. (0 to 10,000 ppm), cutting position along the stem, size of cutting, season, and temperature of the medium.

For `Desert Museum', basal cuttings of slightly hardened new stem growth rooted much better than apical cuttings. Best rooting for apical cuttings was 79% using IBA from 2,500-5,000 ppm. Basal cuttings averaged 95% rooting and showed no response to IBA. Rooting of cuttings taken in September declined to 10% for apical and 2170 for basal cuttings averaged over all IBA levels. Six other species or hybrids of Cercidium and Parkinsonia and five of Prosopis were also rooted.

Free access

In recent years there has become an increased demand for native, drought-tolerant species for private landscaping and revegetation of disturbed sites; especially in the Rocky Mountains and high plains states. Sheperdia canadensis and S. rotundifolia, native to much of this area, have already increased in popularity due to their drought tolerance and general hardiness. Micropropagation and rooting of cuttings have been investigated for these two species. S. canadensis hardwood stem cuttings were successfully rooted with 0.8% IBA at 46.5% as compared to less than 5% from previous research. S. rotundifolia produced a greater number of axillary shoots on WPM as compared to MS medium and at a moderate concentration of BA.

Free access

Abstract

An average Easter lily bulb with 100 scales may produce 8000 or more bulbs in 6 weeks when 1 mm thick cross sections from the scales are cultured in the Linsmaier-Skoog medium as modified by Sheridan and supplemented with 0.03 mg/liter NAA. Continuous darkness at 25°C increased bulb number and size at the expense of leaf number and size while a cycle of 16 hours cool white fluorescence at 1.6 klx (150 ft-c) and 8 hours dark at 25°C suppressed bulb formation but enhanced leaf formation, root weight, and fresh weight of callus. Root numbers were equal in both environments. Cultures incubated at 18.3° exhibited no measurable growth after 6 weeks. Explants from the distal part of the bulb scale will grow only with growth regulators present.

Open Access

Abstract

A single rhizome explant of the Venus fly-trap has the potential to produce 14 or more rooted plantlets in 40 to 60 days when cultured on a medium containing half strength Murashige and Skoog salts, organic components, naphthaleneacetic acid (NAA) at 1.9 mg/liter and 6-benzylamino purine (BA) at 0.2 mg/liter. Cultures were grown in 16 hour cycles of Cool White fluorescent light at 23° to 26°C. Explants derived from either lateral buds or adventitious buds from leaf cuttings have equal potential for rapid multiplication. This same medium produced optimum plantlet size and quality. Supplementing the basal medium with 0.3 or 1.0 mg/liter of GA3 decreased the number of explants and increased the size of plantlets prior to acclimatization. Media containing higher and lower salt concentrations and higher and lower IAA, NAA, 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D), BA, or 6(γ,γ, dimethylallylamino)-purine (2ip), produced fewer plantlets while increasing deleterious effects. The rapid plantlet multiplication procedure described will increase commercial availability of the plants while decreasing collection pressures on wild germplasm pools.

Open Access

conservation and restoration and 2) that large stem cuttings may be further considered for tree restoration projects only if more research identifies constraints to improved success rates. Asexual propagation of healthy Cycas plants is routinely accomplished

Free access

americana is of economic importance because it is used for the production of an alcoholic beverage called “comiteco.” All available plants for the production of this liqueur come from vegetative propagation by suckers. To ensure the availability of adult

Free access

There is great variability among woody plants in their responses to asexual propagation techniques. Although some species root readily from stem cuttings, others are much more difficult to propagate, which can limit their commercial production

Open Access