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Stephen A. Spongberg

1 Horticultural Taxonomist, The Arnold Arboretum.

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Stephen A. Spongberg

1 Horticulturist Taxonomist, The Arnold Arboretum.

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Stephen A. Spongberg

1 Horticultural Taxonomist, The Arnold Arboretum.

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Kathleen M. Kelley, James C. Sellmer and Rebecca H. Robert

Arboretum of the University of Pennsylvania, 2010 ). Various levels of benefits are offered at corresponding prices ( Cheekwood Art and Garden, 2006 ), which may appeal to a diverse audience and to consumers with limited time and financial resources. Other

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Charlotte R. Chan and Robert D. Marquard

The Holden Arboretum, established in 1931, is the largest arboretum in the United States. Its mission is to promote the knowledge and appreciation of plants for personal enjoyment, inspiration, and recreation; for scientific research; and for educational and aesthetic purposes. Of the Arboretum's 3100 acres, 800 acres support collections and display gardens, while the balance comprise natural areas. The collections include nearly 8,000 accessions from 76 plant families; about 700 plant species, some rare or endangered, occupy the natural areas. The education component of the mission connects the Arboretum with the public through school programs, classes, horticultural therapy, and seasonal internships. Two research fellowships are also available. The Holden Arboretum has expanded the research emphasis. The David G. Leach Research Station, part of the Arboretum since 1986, focuses on rhododendron and magnolia breeding and research. Built in 1993, the Horticulture Science Center is a modern research and production facility able to more fully implement and support a broad range of formal horticultural research. The main objective of the research program is to develop superior woody ornamentals for the landscape through hybridization. Additional research emphasizes reproductive biology and using biochemical markers (isozymes and RAPDs) to answer basic questions about the genera under study (Aesculus, Hamamelis, Cercis).

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Chandra S. Thammina, David L. Kidwell-Slak, Stefan Lura and Margaret R. Pooler

collection at the U.S. National Arboretum. DNA extraction and polymerase chain reaction amplification of SSRs. Genomic DNA was extracted from frozen leaf tissue of 53 Asian Cercis accessions using a PowerPlant ® Pro DNA Isolation Kit (Mo Bio Laboratories

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David Creech, Greg Grant and Dawn Parish

The SFA Mast Arboretum began as a landscape plant materials class project on the south side of the Agriculture building in 1985. In 2000, over 20 theme gardens now occupy 18 acres. The garden is computer mapped and an accessioning system is in place. Theme garden developments include daylilies, herbs, a rock garden, a xeriscape, plants for shade, wetland, and bog conditions, a line of vines, an Asian Valley, conifers and hollies, and numerous gardens that trial and display herbaceous perennials. Recent developments include a children's garden and, the biggest project to date, an 8-acre SFA Ruby Mize Azalea garden, with a grand opening in Apr. 2000. Theme gardens are utilized to display collections. Significant assemblages include Rhododendron (400 cultivars and selections), Acer (168 cultivars), Camellia (210 cultivars), Loropetalum (18 taxa), Cephalotaxus (43 taxa), Magnolia (47 taxa), Abelia (37 taxa), Ilex (73 taxa), and others. Plant performance and observational information is recorded. Second author Grant has numerous plant introductions in the past 5 years, many that are well represented in the nursery industry and recognized by TAMU's Coordinated Educational and Marketing Assistance Program (CEMAP) as “Texas Superstar” promotions (trademarked). SFA Mast Arboretum plants are promoted via distributions, trade articles, and the Arboretum's website: www.sfasu.edu/ag/arboretum.

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David L. Creech

The SFA Arboretum is evidence that small horticulture programs can capitalize on what's right outside the back door of the building. Initiated in 1985 as a lab project in a landscape plant materials course on the south side of the Agriculture building, the collection has grown to over 3000 taxa displayed in a ten-acre public garden setting. The Arboretum's mission is to 1) promote the conservation and use of native plants, 2) evaluate “new” landscape plant materials, and 3) serve as a living laboratory for students in Horticulture, Agriculture, Biology and Forestry. Funding improvements in the last two years and the creation of a Board of Advisors and a Volunteer Corps organization has addressed problems in routine landscape maintenance and getting “new” garden developments off the ground. A “Plants with Promise” program acquires, tests, propagates, distributes and promotes superior “new” woody plants. Outstanding performers include Bignonia capreolata 'atrosangainea', Campsis grandiflora, Cinnamomum chekingensis, Euschapis japonica, Scuttelaria suffretescens 'pink', Sinojackia rehderiana, Taxodium mucronatum, Viburnum propinquum, various Styrax species and varieties, several Michelia species, Illicium henryi, three Mexico oaks, and many others. AutoCAD maps and a plant inventory database tracks plant location and acquisition data. A just-completed GIS-based analysis of the university forest paves the way for a campus-as-arboretum effort. The premise of this paper is that high-visibility, easy-access display/evaluation gardens offer Horticulture Departments the opportunity for enhanced student recruitment, community involvement, external funding, environmental education, and the potential for significant contributions to the nursery industry.

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Allen D. Owings, Charles E. Johnson and M. LeRon Robbins

Educational and research opportunities utilizing native plant species are being developed by the LSU Agricultural Center through the recent establishment of a native plant arboretum at the Calhoun Research Station. Plants indigenous to Louisiana and surrounding states are being collected and planted in the arboretum for evaluation of potential values for landscaping, in food industries, and/or wildlife management. Native trees being studied include species of oak (Quercus), maple (Acer), hickory (Carya), and dogwood (Cornus). Lesser known species of holly (Ilex) and hawthorn (Crataegus), are being evaluated for commercial production and landscape potential. Fruit being collected for field orchard studies include mayhaw (Crataegus opaca), pawpaw (Asimina triloba), and several native plums (Prunus spp.).

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Holly L. Scoggins

well as environmental awareness and stewardship. University gardens can also re-focus their roles as collaborator and partner beyond the horticulture or plant science student. The University of California-Davis Arboretum has framed their organizational