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Lyn A. Gettys

environmental conditions, disease, predation, and intentional or inadvertent pest control operations. An important factor that seems to drive weedy behavior in native aquatic plants is what I term “competition release,” or targeted management of introduced

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Richard O. Carey, George J. Hochmuth, Christopher J. Martinez, Treavor H. Boyer, Vimala D. Nair, Michael D. Dukes, Gurpal S. Toor, Amy L. Shober, John L. Cisar, Laurie E. Trenholm, and Jerry B. Sartain

, and leachate from solid waste facilities. The regulatory and management framework associated with each of these nutrient sources determines the overall impact of urban areas on adjacent water resources. Strategies to identify and reduce urban

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P. Chris Wilson and Joseph P. Albano

drainage infrastructure and other nontarget aquatic environments owing to eutrophication. Eutrophication is defined as an increase in the concentration of plant nutrients ( deGruyter, 1996 ). Eutrophication is usually indicated by algal blooms and excessive

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Melissa Bravo, Antonio DiTommaso, and David Hayes

given the European colonization of this area of New York in the 1600s. The management of these private homes/parcels was assumed by the National Park Service (NPS) in 1940 at which time additional plantings occurred. The historical interpretive period

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A. Fortuna, P.E. Rieke, L.W. Jacobs, B. Leinauer, and D.E. Karcher

Rapid aquatic plant growth in Michigan's smaller lakes has reduced their navigability and recreational use. Harvested aquatic weeds have posed a new waste disposal issue for municipalities. Application of lake weeds as a soil amendment on area farms was viewed as a possible waste management option that might benefit local sod producers. The objectives of this study were to 1) estimate the amount of plant-available N (PAN) released from lake weed material, 2) determine the chemical composition of aquatic plant tissues and their effect on plant-available moisture, and 3) study turfgrass response to lake weed applications using the criteria of turfgrass quality, growth, and N uptake. Rates of lake weed refuse applied to field plots were 96, 161, and 206 Mg·ha-1. Two 47-day laboratory incubations were conducted with the same rates of refuse. Relative to biosolids, the metal content of the lake weeds was low and the nutrient content high. One megagram of lake weeds contained 0.37 kg of P and 2.5 kg of K. The decay constant for the C fraction in lake weeds was 8 to 10 days and 16 days for the N fraction. Estimates of the N supplied by lake weeds (570, 960, and 1200 kg PAN/ha) were based on data from C and N incubations. Application of lake weeds significantly increased plant-available soil moisture and significantly enhanced sod establishment and turf density, resulting in decreased weed pressure. However, excess N was present at higher application rates. Management concerns during the application of lake weeds should focus on nutrient loading and the timing of plant-available N release. Depending on methods of weed harvesting, we observed that large amounts of unwanted trash present in the plant biomass could discourage use by growers. Land application of lake weed refuse could ease waste disposal problems, reduce fertilizer inputs for sod growers, and improve the moisture status of sands. Further, this information can be of value to environmental regulatory agencies in determining safe and proper use of such waste materials.

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Lyn A. Gettys and William T. Haller

The number of herbicides labeled for aquatic weed control is small compared with those available for terrestrial weed management. In addition, the development of herbicide resistance has been reported in aquatic weeds, which further limits the

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Lyn A. Gettys and William T. Haller

these valuable plants with herbicide-treated irrigation water is highly undesirable. Previous research has reported the effects of other aquatic herbicides on turfgrasses, crops, and ornamental species ( Andrew et al., 2003 ; Gettys and Haller, 2009

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Lyn A. Gettys and Michael A. Schnelle

.A. Gettys outlined native aquatic plants that “break bad” and act like invasive species. J.M. Ruter focused on reforming the “seedy character” cherry laurel ( Prunus caroliniana ), and K.W. Leonhardt talked about using induced sterility as a management

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Robert F. Polomski, Douglas G. Bielenberg, Ted Whitwell, Milton D. Taylor, William C. Bridges, and Stephen J. Klaine

. Offsite movement of nitrate–nitrogen (NO 3 − ) and soluble reactive phosphate (H 2 PO 4 − , HPO 4 2− , and PO 4 3− ) from nursery and greenhouse operations may lead to excessive algal and aquatic plant growth in surface waters, resulting in

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Heather Hasandras, Kimberly A. Moore, and Lyn A. Gettys

Conservation of aquatic plant areas is crucial to promote a balanced ecosystem of food and habitats for fish and birds. Natural interactions in aquatic communities are supported by native aquatic plants that help improve water quality by removing