Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 179 items for :

  • aquatic plant x
  • All content x
Clear All
Open access

Lyn A. Gettys and Kimberly A. Moore

Projects that focus on restoration, mitigation, and enhancement of aquatic and wetland regions provide valuable ecosystem services and habitat for native flora and fauna ( Brix, 1994 ). These projects call for a mixture of plant types and sizes to

Open access

Lyn A. Gettys

Non-native invasive species pose a significant threat to aquatic ecosystems and can disrupt the use of invaded systems. For example, alien plants often outcompete indigenous flora and form monocultures that cannot be used by native fauna, which

Full access

Heather Hasandras, Kimberly A. Moore, and Lyn A. Gettys

Conservation of aquatic plant areas is crucial to promote a balanced ecosystem of food and habitats for fish and birds. Natural interactions in aquatic communities are supported by native aquatic plants that help improve water quality by removing

Open access

Lyn A. Gettys, Kyle L. Thayer, and Joseph W. Sigmon

oversaw the expenditure of $17.007 million and $15.126 million in federal and state funds to control aquatic plants in Florida’s public water bodies in fiscal year (FY) 2017–18 and FY 2018–19, respectively ( FWC, 2018 , 2019a ). More than half of this

Free access

Robert F. Polomski, Douglas G. Bielenberg, Ted Whitwell, Milton D. Taylor, William C. Bridges, and Stephen J. Klaine

oxidize the rhizosphere ( Gersberg et al., 1986 ; Moorhead and Reddy, 1988 ), which also supports microbial growth and aids in the decomposition of organic matter. Widely used aquatic emergent plants in subsurface flow-constructed wetland designs

Free access

A. Fortuna, P.E. Rieke, L.W. Jacobs, B. Leinauer, and D.E. Karcher

Rapid aquatic plant growth in Michigan's smaller lakes has reduced their navigability and recreational use. Harvested aquatic weeds have posed a new waste disposal issue for municipalities. Application of lake weeds as a soil amendment on area farms was viewed as a possible waste management option that might benefit local sod producers. The objectives of this study were to 1) estimate the amount of plant-available N (PAN) released from lake weed material, 2) determine the chemical composition of aquatic plant tissues and their effect on plant-available moisture, and 3) study turfgrass response to lake weed applications using the criteria of turfgrass quality, growth, and N uptake. Rates of lake weed refuse applied to field plots were 96, 161, and 206 Mg·ha-1. Two 47-day laboratory incubations were conducted with the same rates of refuse. Relative to biosolids, the metal content of the lake weeds was low and the nutrient content high. One megagram of lake weeds contained 0.37 kg of P and 2.5 kg of K. The decay constant for the C fraction in lake weeds was 8 to 10 days and 16 days for the N fraction. Estimates of the N supplied by lake weeds (570, 960, and 1200 kg PAN/ha) were based on data from C and N incubations. Application of lake weeds significantly increased plant-available soil moisture and significantly enhanced sod establishment and turf density, resulting in decreased weed pressure. However, excess N was present at higher application rates. Management concerns during the application of lake weeds should focus on nutrient loading and the timing of plant-available N release. Depending on methods of weed harvesting, we observed that large amounts of unwanted trash present in the plant biomass could discourage use by growers. Land application of lake weed refuse could ease waste disposal problems, reduce fertilizer inputs for sod growers, and improve the moisture status of sands. Further, this information can be of value to environmental regulatory agencies in determining safe and proper use of such waste materials.

Free access

Michael E. Kane, Edward F. Gilman, Matthew A. Jenks, and Thomas J. Sheehan

Procedures for in vitro establishment, rapid shoot proliferation, and ex vitro plantlet acclimatization of Cryptocoryne lucens de Witt were determined. Shoot cultures were established from surface-sterilized shoot tips cultured on Linsmaier and Skoog salts and vitamins medium (LS) solidified with 0.8% (w/v) agar and supplemented with 2.0 μm BA and 0.5 μm NAA. The effect of BA (0 to 20 μm) and 0.5 μm NAA on shoot multiplication from single-node and clustered triple-node shoot explants was determined after 35 days. The most efficient shoot proliferation (7.7 shoots/explant) occurred from single-node shoot explants cultured on LS + 20 μm BA and 0.5 μm NAA. Maximum plantlet establishment was achieved by direct sticking of triple-node (cluster) microcuttings in either soilless planting medium or polyurethane foam cubes. Production of highly branched salable plants from microcuttings was possible within 18 weeks. Chemical names used: N-(phenylmethyl) -1H-purin-6-amine (BA); 1-naphthaleneacetic acid (NAA).

Full access

Tyler J. Koschnick, William T. Haller, and Greg E. MacDonald

University of Florida, Institute for Food and Agricultural Sciences, Center for Aquatic and Invasive Plants, 7922 NW 71st St., Gainesville, FL 32653. Published as Journal Series Number R-10419 of the Florida Agriculture Experiment Station. This

Full access

Tyler J. Koschnick, William T. Haller, and Alison M. Fox

University of Florida, Institute for Food and Agricultural Sciences, Center for Aquatic and Invasive Plants, 7922 NW 71st St., Gainesville, FL 32653. Published as Journal Series Number R-10420 of the Florida Agriculture Experiment Station. This

Free access

Robert F. Polomski, Douglas G. Bielenberg, Ted Whitwell, Milton D. Taylor, William C. Bridges, and Stephen J. Klaine

. Offsite movement of nitrate–nitrogen (NO 3 − ) and soluble reactive phosphate (H 2 PO 4 − , HPO 4 2− , and PO 4 3− ) from nursery and greenhouse operations may lead to excessive algal and aquatic plant growth in surface waters, resulting in