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microsporogenesis and anther development. The development of anthers is complicated. Cells in different anther tissues undergo different processes that lead to conspicuous changes in morphology and structure; these processes include meiosis in microspore mother

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reproductive organ of angiosperms. The development of anthers, the parts of the stamen where pollen is produced, is a delicate and complex process that includes the formation of the anther wall tissue (with a protective function) and pollen (with a reproductive

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The anthers of angiosperms are complex male sex organs, and their development is a precisely regulated biological process ( Pearce et al., 2015 ). During anther development, various structural and physiological changes occur, and these changes

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Abstract

Callus developed from anther explants of Cucumis sativus L. cultured an modified Nitsch and Nitsch and on Murashige and Skoog basal media. Meristemoids and embryoids were induced when callus was recultured on solidified Nitsch medium containing 20 g/liter rafflnose. Embryoids developed into seedlings.

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It studies the changes of endogenous hormones and polyamines in cytoplasmic male sterile non-heading Chinese cabbage (Brassica campestris L. ssp. chinensis Makino var. communis Tsen et Lee). Results showed that the microspore was prone to being sterile when there were lack of IAA, GA and polyamines, especially Put and abundant with ZRs and ABA in the anther. The imbalance of IAA/ZRs also easily caused the anther sterile.

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male sterility in plants has always been a hot spot in the field of botany. Usually, in research on male sterility, cell biology studies on aborted anther development are indispensable and are the first studies conducted, as these studies can reveal the

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pollen viability was low. Nonetheless, the structural events of anther development involved in petaloid-type male sterility in C. oleifera remain unknown. Therefore, in our study, we examined the anther structure and pollen morphology for a cytological

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studied ( Chua, 2016 ; Kang et al., 2013 ; Sakunphueak et al., 2013 ; Su et al., 2012 ), reports of detailed studies on anther development, cytological features, and distribution of nutritional reserves in the anthers of I. balsamina are scarce. The

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