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, voluntary removal of invasive plants from inventories, use of notification labels on plants to inform about invasive characteristics, promotion of noninvasive alternatives, taxation of invasive plants sold, and acceptability of sterile, genetically altered

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and choosing sustainable alternatives intensifies the issue of invasive plant spread in Florida, USA ( Wilson and Deng 2023 ). The “Plant This Not That: A Guide to Avoiding Invasive Plant Species in Florida” extension booklet ( McIntyre et al. 2021

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/or sterile cultivar alternatives suitable for ecologically friendly landscapes and gardens. Evaluation of nonfruiting ornamental cultivars as alternatives to invasive plants Over the past 2 decades in Florida, the invasive potential of nearly 20

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notion that all native plants are well suited for landscape purposes. Failed attempts in using native shrubs to replace invasive species may result in future reluctance of homeowners, landscapers, and growers to embrace native species as alternatives to

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formation in polyploids: Do segmental allopolyploids exist? Genome 39 1176 1184 Weber, E. 2003 Invasive plant species of the world: A reference guide to environmental weeds CABI Cambridge, MA

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The invasive plant management program in Florida has contracted over 190 research projects at a cost of $19.8 million over the last 39 years ( Schmitz, 2009 ). Despite these efforts, plant invasions continue to rise. The State of Florida is the

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oversaw the expenditure of $17.007 million and $15.126 million in federal and state funds to control aquatic plants in Florida’s public water bodies in fiscal year (FY) 2017–18 and FY 2018–19, respectively ( FWC, 2018 , 2019a ). More than half of this

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., 2015 ), Spain ( Amaro-Blanco et al., 2018 ), Greece ( Margaritopoulou et al., 2018 ), and Israel ( Matzrafi et al., 2015 ). These species are native to the Americas ( Amaro-Blanco et al., 2018 ) and considered as invasive and troublesome species in many

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-knot nematode resistance genes Me1 and Me3 in pepper Plant Breed. 120 429 433 Civerolo, E.L. Narang, S.K. Ross, R. Vick, K.W. Greczy, L. 1993 Alternatives to methyl bromide: Assessment of research needs and priorities. Proc. USDA Wkshp. on Alternatives to

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Consumers were surveyed at the 2004 Philadelphia Flower Show in Philadelphia, Pa. from 8–10 Mar., to quantify their attitudes and behaviors towards invasive plant species and the potential problems associated with purchasing and planting invasives in the landscape. A majority of the 341 participants (81.5%) was aware that non-native exotic plants were used in the landscape and that these plants may be invasive in natural areas. Less than half (40.1%) acknowledged owning plants that were considered invasive, while one-third (33.5%) did not know. Less than half (41.3%) believed that laws should be passed to prevent sale of non-native exotic plants, while 27.8% believed that laws should be passed to allow sale of only native plants in their area. Three distinct consumer segments were identified using cluster analysis: “Invasive savvy,” participants knowledgeable about invasives and interested in alternative species; “Invasive neutral,” participants neutral in their decision to purchasing alternatives to invasive plants and price sensitive in regard to paying more for plants tested for invasiveness; and “Invasive inactive,” participants opposed to purchasing genetically modified plants or those bred to be seedless. Survey results indicated that media sources (e.g., television and newspapers/magazines/books) would be effective for educating consumers about potential problems associated with invasive species in the landscape.

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