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Abstract

Soil drench of succininc acid-2, 2-dimethylhydrazide (daminozide) on Taxus × media Rehd. cv. Densiformis in the growth chamber inhibited growth of young roots but had little effect on cold acclimation. Daminozide soil drenches at 1000-4000 ppm retarded root growth but did not predispose roots to greater cold hardiness after subsequent cold acclimation conditions. Daminozide applied during cold acclimation did not increase root cold hardiness.

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Abstract

Timing and rate of acclimation and maximum low-temperature survival of eight woody taxa were determined over six sample dates from 25 Aug. 1987 to 25 Apr. 1988. Four cultivars of Acer rubrum L. (red maple) acclimated at different rates and attained different levels of midwinter cold hardiness. ‘Red Sunset’ (RS) and ‘October Glory’ (OG), northern selections, acclimated at faster rates and attained greater degrees of cold hardiness than ‘Journalism Psychology’ (JP) and ‘Upright Crown’ (UC) selected from southern seed sources. Maximum cold hardiness levels were −8C (JP), −23C (UC), −29C (RS), and −29C (OG). Amelanchier arborea (Michx. f.) Fern, (downy serviceberry) and Quercus coccinea Muenchh. (scarlet oak) developed midwinter hardiness of less than −29C and −20C, respectively. Illicium floridanum Ellis (Florida anise) and Illicium parviflorum Michx. (small anise) developed −26C and −20C midwinter hardiness, respectively. According to our data, woody taxa should be evaluated for timing and rates of acclimation and low-temperature tolerances, since performance will vary from one geographic area to another, depending on photoperiod, the timing of fall freezes, and midwinter temperatures.

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brings about an increase in freezing tolerance through a process termed cold acclimation ( Thomashow, 1999 ). Within the family Solanaceae, even within the genus Solanum , species vary considerably in their ability to cold-acclimate. The chilling

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avoiding the perils of unseasonable warm spells in late winter and do this without adversely delaying the time of fruiting. Acclimation in woody perennials is perhaps less critical than deacclimation because acclimation is a steady, incremental process, and

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biochemical adjustment that protect them from injury when environmental stresses abruptly occur. Cold acclimation (CA) is a phenomenon that occurs when the freezing tolerance of plants increases after exposure to low, nonfreezing temperatures ( Thomashow, 1999

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as temperatures fall and photoperiod decreases during autumn ( McKenzie et al., 1988 ), and significant advances in understanding the physiological changes that alfalfa undergoes during cold acclimation have been made ( Castonguay et al., 2006

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acclimation of leaf physiological function, stressed the close relationship between the distribution of photosynthetic traits and the local light regime in species grown in the open field ( Field and Mooney, 1986 ; Niinemets et al., 2004 ) and under

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in marketable yield resulting from shade is not necessarily proportional to the reduction in light intensity. There is a physiological acclimation of plants to a reduced light intensity. During fruit production in greenhouses with 0.52 shade density

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acclimation to low temperatures that alter various metabolic processes to physiologically precondition plants for subsequent freezing stress ( Guy, 1999 ; Thomashow, 1999 ). Two consecutive stages of cold acclimation have been suggested in winter cereals and

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undergo cold acclimation in late fall as temperature drop and photoperiod gets shorter. It has been well documented that increased cold acclimation could improve freeze tolerance of plants, including turfgrasses ( Anderson et al., 2003 ). Plants possess

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