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In the United States, zoysiagrass refers to two perennial species from the genus Zoysia ( Z. japonica and Z. matrella ) that are used as a warm-season turfgrass for lawns, parks, and golfing surfaces (tees, fairways, roughs, bunker faces) in the

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phytoremediation on agricultural land is to return the soil’s ecology to one that can support crop production. Remedial plant species should have Al resistance and high biomass. Zoysiagrass ( Zoysia Willd., family Poaceae) is a perennial turfgrass that is mainly

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Zoysiagrass ( Zoysia japonica Steud.) is a popular turfgrass species used in golf course fairways in Missouri and surrounding states ( Lyman et al., 2007 ). Throughout this region, zoysiagrass enters dormancy typically in November and resumes

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). There are 11 species in the Zoysia genus, of which three are used as a turfgrass: Z. japonica , Z. matrella , and Z. pacifica ( Engelke and Anderson, 2003 ). In the United States, zoysiagrass is used extensively on golf courses and home lawns

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Zoysiagrass ( Zoysia spp.) is a common warm-season turfgrass well adapted in use of lawns and golf courses in many regions because of its excellent heat tolerance, density, low pesticide requirements, and minimal maintenance inputs ( Patton et al

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sustainability and growth were improved when irrigation was applied and that irrigation could counteract the difficulties imposed by the reduced substrate depth. The first objective of this research was to compare the growth of Manilagrass [ Zoysia matrella (L

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clipping regimes Crop Sci. 2 132 135 Anderson, S.J. 2000 Taxonomy of Zoysia (poaceae): Morphological and molecular variation PhD diss., Texas A&M Univ College Station, TX Beard, J.B. 1973 Turfgrass: Science and culture Prentice-Hall Englewood Cliffs, NJ

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We compared evapotranspiration (ET) rates for 11 Zoysia genotypes, encompassing two species and their hybrid, maintained at nonlimiting soil moisture under field conditions and in an environmental chamber of high evaporative potential. ET rate relationships to leaf area [leaf extension rate (LER)], canopy resistance [shoot density (SHD)], and internal resistance [abaxial (AB) and adaxial (AD) leaf blade stomatal densities] characteristics were determined. Three-year ET rate means were not significantly different among genotypes in the field study, but ET rates among genotypes differed significantly under the higher evaporative potential of an environmental-chamber study. ET rate was not significantly correlated with LER for either the data from the field or the chamber. ET rates of both types of tests also were not significantly correlated with SHD or AB or AD leaf blade stomatal density. Data from field and environmental-chamber research suggest that differences of individual morphological traits among the 11 zoysiagrasses do not influence the ET rate when measured from minilysimeters maintained at nonlimiting soil moisture.

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’s Super Sport’ (Celebration ® ) bermudagrass ( Cynodon dactylon ); ‘SS-500’ (Empire ® ) and ‘Palisades’ japanese lawngrass ( Zoysia japonica Steud.); Zeon Zoysia ® manilagrass [ Zoysia matrella (L.) Merr.]; ‘Raleigh’, ‘Floratam’, and ‘SS-100’ (Palmetto

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Establishment of zoysiagrass (Zoysia japonica Steud.) from sprigs is often impractical for golf courses and sports fields because of the slow growth rate of the species and subsequent long establishment period. A study was conducted at two different sites in Arkansas to evaluate the effects of soil topdressing and post-plant fertility rates on establishment of zoysiagrass from vegetative sprigs. Each site was planted according to standard methods using freshly-harvested sprigs (18 m3/ha) and either top dressed with 1.0 cm of native soil or maintained without topdressing. Beginning immediately after establishment, N was applied monthly at rates of 0, 1.25, 2.50, 3.75, or 5.0 g·m-2 as urea. Rate of cover was monitored throughout the growing season and elemental analysis of plant tissues was determined 120 days after planting. Topdressing the sprigs with native soil significantly improved establishment compared to traditional sprigging at both sites, presumably because of enhanced sprig survival. Applications of N during the establishment period had little or no overall effect on establishment, although the 0 g·m-2 rate was slightly inferior to all other rates. This study indicates that methods that enhance sprig survival are more important than added fertility for the rapid establishment of zoysiagrass sprigs.

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