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Paul M. Lyrene

sterile to highly fertile, depending on which species are combined and on the particular hybrid plant within a cross ( Lyrene, 2011 ; Ritchie 1955a , 1955b ; Rousi, 1963 ; Tsuda et al., 2013 ). Vaccinium stamineum (section Polycodium ; common name

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Paul M. Lyrene

Vaccinium stamineum (deerberry), a highly polymorphic diploid species, is the only species in Vaccinium section Polycodium ( Ashe, 1931 ; Baker, 1970 ; Camp, 1945 ). Endemic in North America, it is found from southwestern Ontario to central

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Paul M. Lyrene

tetraploid V. padifolium (section Hemimyrtillus ). A self-fertile F 1 hybrid between V. corymbodendron (section Pyxothamnus ) and diploid V. vitis-idaea (section Vitis-idaea ) was reported by Ehlenfeldt et al. (2018) . Vaccinium stamineum

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R.L. Darnell, R. Cano-Medrano, and K.E. Koch

Variability in sucrose levels and metabolism in ripe fruit of several Vaccinium species were examined. The objective was to determine if sufficient variability for fruit sucrose accumulation was present in existing populations to warrant attempts to breed for high-sucrose fruit, which potentially would be less subject to bird predation. Three-fold differences in fruit sucrose concentration were found among species, ranging from 19 to 24 mg·(g fw)-1 in V. stamineum and V. arboreum to about 7 mg·(g fw)-1 in cultivated blueberry (V. ashei and V. corymbosum) and V. darrowi. Soluble acid invertase activity was negatively correlated with fruit sucrose concentration. There was no apparent correlation between fruit sugar concentration and either sucrose phosphate synthase or sucrose synthase activities, both of which were low for all species studied. The degree of variability in fruit sucrose accumulation among Vaccinium species supports the feasibility of developing high sucrose fruit, which would be a potentially valuable addition to current strategies of minimizing crop losses to birds.

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Ebrahiem M. Babiker, Stephen J. Stringer, Barbara J. Smith, and Hamidou F. Sakhanokho

range of evergreen plant species, including native Vaccinium species. Since the alternate host is not present in the southeastern states, further investigation is needed to identify the inoculum source in this area. Several southern highbush cultivars

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Daniel J. Bell, Lisa J. Rowland, James J. Polashock, and Frank A. Drummond

deerberry ( Vaccinium stamineum L.). Here, we were able to use as few as 28 markers from six primers to uniquely distinguish all the 10 lowbush blueberry clones in this study. Thus, both RAPDs and our EST-PCR markers are efficient at identifying genets

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Ebrahiem M. Babiker, Stephen J. Stringer, Hamidou F. Sakhanokho, Barbara J. Smith, and James J. Polashock

. Vc= Vaccinium corymbosum, Vv = V. virgatum , Ve = Vaccinium elliottii , Vd = V. darrowii , Va = V. arboreum , Vs = V. stamineum , and Vp = V. pallidum . Bars indicate ± se of the mean. Table 5. Analysis of variance of average lesion length

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Mark K. Ehlenfeldt and James L. Luteyn

. stamineum HortScience 51 15 22 doi: 10.21273/HORTSCI.51.1.15 Morozov, O.V. 2007 The prospects for using Vaccinium uliginosum L. × Vaccinium vitis-idaea L. hybrid in breeding Intl. J. Fruit Sci. 6 43 56 doi: 10.1300/J492v06n04 05 Powell, E.A. Kron, K

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John C. Beaulieu, Rebecca E. Stein-Chisholm, and Deborah L. Boykin

, S.F. Payne, J.A. 1996 Comparison of volatile compounds from rabbiteye blueberry ( Vaccinium ashei ) and deerberry ( V. stamineum ) during maturation J. Essential Oil Res. 8 645 648 Horvat, R.J. Senter, S.D. 1985 Comparison of the volatile