Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 33 items for :

Clear All

The objectives of this study were to determine root and shoot growth periodicity for established Fraxinus pennsylvanica Marsh. (green ash), Quercus coccinea Muenchh. (scarlet oak), Corylus colurna L. (Turkish hazelnut), and Syringa reticulata (Blume) Hara `Ivory Silk' (tree lilac) trees and to evaluate three methods of root growth periodicity measurement. Two methods were evaluated using a rhizotron. One method measured the extension rate (RE) ofindividual roots, and the second method measured change in root length (RL) against an observation grid. A third method, using periodic counts of new roots present on minirhizotrons (MR), was also evaluated. RE showed the least variability among individual trees. Shoot growth began before or simultaneously with the beginning of root growth for all species with all root growth measurement methods. All species had concurrent shoot and root growth, and no distinct alternating growth patterns were evident when root growth was measured by RE. Alternating root and shoot growth was evident, however, when root growth was measured by RL and MR. RE measured extension rate of larger diameter lateral roots, RL measured increase in root length of all diameter lateral roots and MR measured new root count of all sizes of lateral and vertical roots. Root growth periodicity patterns differed with the measurement method and the types of roots measured.

Free access

Root and shoot growth periodicity were determined for Fraxinus pennsylvanica Marsh. (green ash), Quercus coccinea Muenchh.,Corylus colurna L. (Turkish hazehut) and Syriaga reticulara (Blume) Hara `Ivory Silk' (tree lilac) trees. Two methods for determining root growth periodicity using a rhizotron were evaluated. One method measured the extension rate of individual roots, and the second method measured change in root length density. A third method, using periodic counts of new roots present on minirhizotrons, was also evaluated. The root extension method showed the least variability among individual trees. Shoot growth began before or simultaneously with the beginning of root growth for all species with all root growth measurement methods. Species with similar shoot phenologies had similar root phenologies when root growth was measured by the root extension method, but not when root growth was measured by the other methods. All species had concurrent shoot and root growth, and no distinct alternating growth patterns were evident when root growth was measured with the root extension method. Alternating root and shoot growth was evident, however, when root growth was measured by the other methods.

Free access

Root and shoot phenology were observed, and root length within rootballs were calculated for Fraxinus pennsylvanica Marsh. (green ash), Quecus coccinea Muenchh. (scarlet oak), Corylus colurna L. (Turkish hazelnut), and Syringa reticulata (Blume) Hara `Ivory Silk' (tree lilac) trees established in a rhizotron. Easy-to-transplant species (green ash and tree lilac) had more root length within rootballs than difficult-to-transplant species (Turkish hazelnut and scarlet oak). Shoot growth began before root growth on all species except scarlet oak, which began root and shoot growth simultaneously. Fall root growth ceased for all species just after leaf drop. Implications for tree transplanting are discussed.

Free access

the leaves and twigs of three oak species [turkey oak ( Q. cerris ), downy oak ( Q. pubescens ), and english oak] and found significant differences in endophytic mycobiota species composition between them. Survival times were significantly longer for

Full access
Author:

Abstract

Once upon a time, in a far-off land, a member of the genus Gallus was walking through a forest populated with trees of the genus Quercus. Suddenly, something fell and struck this creature on the head. The creature was quite cowardly—you might even call it “chicken”—and it began to run and cry, “The sky is falling, the sky is falling, and I must tell the king”. On the way to the palace, she encountered other feathered members, whose names are really inappropriate to use in a sophisticated presidential address—names such as Henny Penny, Cocky Locky, Goosey Loosey, and Turkey Lurkey—and she told them the news and they joined her in her rush to see the king. They then met a rather devious character, who said he would show them a short-cut to the palace, but he really intended to have a sumptuous dinner of low-cholesterol, low-protein poultry products. Chicken Little forever remained a pessimist and never again went into the oak forest without an umbrella.

Open Access

Root-pruned Live Oak Trees Root systems are frequently reduced during transplanting. Martínez-Trinidad et al. (p. 46) evaluated the impact of paclobutrazol (PBZ) on the overall growth and vitality of root-pruned, field-grown live oaks. They found that

Full access

-resistant wood was used for telegraph and telephone poles, mine props, railroad ties, rail fences, shingles, and barn construction ( Brooks, 1937 ). Chestnut seed fed turkeys, deer, black bears, and local residents every autumn and were an important cash crop for

Free access

location, but serve different functions, including providing shade and ornamentation. Evergreens, such as iranian cedar ( Cupressus sempervirens ) and turkish pine ( Pinus brutia ), and deciduous trees, such as ornamental plane tree ( Platanus orientalis

Open Access

ash, scarlet oak, turkish hazelnut, and tree lilac J. Amer. Soc. Hort. Sci. 120 211 216 10.21273/JASHS.120.2.211 Harris, J.R. Fanelli, J. 1999 Root and shoot growth periodicity of pot-in-pot red and sugar maple

Free access

Pomegranate ( Punica granatum L.) is native from Iran to the Himalayas in northern India ( Nemati et al., 2012 ), grown widely in Iran, India, Spain, Afghanistan, Pakistan, Turkey, and the United States ( Elyatem and Kader, 1984 ; Sarkhosh et al

Free access