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Jason D. Lattier and Ryan N. Contreras

Syringa is a diverse genus in the olive family (Oleaceae) representing 22–30 species from two centers of diversity: the highlands of East Asia and the Balkan-Carpathian region of Europe ( Kochieva et al., 2004 ). Most lilacs are native to Asia

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Hsuan Chen, Jason D. Lattier, Kelly Vining, and Ryan N. Contreras

Lilacs ( Syringa sp.) have been used as hardy ornamental plants by humans throughout history because of their showy, fragrant flowers and winterhardiness ( Dirr, 2009 ; Juntheikki-Palovaara et al., 2013 ). Lilacs are an economically important

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Scott C. Redlin, Dale E. Herman, and Larry J. Chaput

Pekin lilac ( Syringa pekinensis Rupr.), a tree lilac native to northern China, has many desirable horticultural traits but is underused as a landscape plant ( Dirr, 1998 ). A combination of pest resistance and superior ornamental characteristics

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Joseph M. Caprio and Robert D. Snyder

The within-station performance of the most accurate phenological model in each of three classes of hourly models was compared for the ability to predict flowering dates of common purple lilac (Syringa vulgaris L.). For the three model classes used, day-only, solar thermal unit (STU), and 24-hour interpolations were made between three threshold temperatures and five effective temperature exponents. The most accurate within-station model for each of the three model classes, all having a threshold temperature of 5C, were: (T - 5)1.54 day-only, (T - 5)1.26 R0.5 STU, and (T - 5)1.70 24-hour, where T = temperature and R = solar radiation. These three models and the corresponding three linear temperature exponent models were then compared for among-station performance using 10 sites in the western United States. The most accurate model for the among-station analyses was the (T - 5)1.0 day-only model. The two STU models did not perform as well as the two day-only and the two 24-hour models.

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Tyler C. Hoskins, Jason D. Lattier, and Ryan N. Contreras

Common lilac ( Syringa vulgaris ) is a clonally propagated woody shrub that has been the subject of intense breeding for centuries due to its fragrant, colorful spring blooms ( Fiala and Vrugtman, 2008 ). The majority of species originated in Asia

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Lynne Edick Caton and Steve McCulloch

Briggs Nursery has micropropagated lilacs commercially since 1982. Presently we are producing more than 30 species and hybrids and have observed that media requirements vary significantly. In this study 5 lilacs representing a range of germtypic and phenotypic differences were examined to optimize cytokinin concentrations for shoot growth in vitro. Lilacs were grown on MS salts with BA, 2iP, and zeatin used individually and in combination. Plants were subculture 3 times, at 6 week intervals, at the conclusion of which quantitative data was taken with respect to shoot multiplication, elongation, and quality. These factors help determine the commercial practicality of producing lilacs through tissue culture.

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Jason D. Lattier and Ryan N. Contreras

’ and × Chitalpa tashkentensis ( Contreras et al., 2007 ; Olsen et al., 2006 ). Syringa is a genus of deciduous, woody trees, and shrubs grown primarily for their heavy spring and summer blooms of fragrant flowers. Syringa comprised 21–28 species

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Freek Vrugtman

1 Registrar for Syringa. Contribution No. 76, Royal Botanical Gardens, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada.

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Freek Vrugtman

Registrar, International Registration Authority for cultivar names in the genus Syringa. Contribution No. 92, Royal Botanical Gardens, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada.

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Freek Vrugtman

Contribution No. 102, Royal Botanical Gardens, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada. 1 International Lilac Registrar, International Cultivar Registration Authority Genus Syringa L.