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White mold, caused by the necrotrophic fungal pathogen Sclerotinia sclerotiorum , causes stem rot, crown rot, wilt, and death of many common annual bedding plants, including zinnia, petunia, verbena, snap dragon, and salvia ( Boland and Hall, 1994

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strategy ( Subbarao, 1998 ). Lettuce drop can be caused by two fungal species, Sclerotinia minor and S. sclerotiorum . Although the species are known to coexist in western US lettuce production districts, lettuce drop in the Central Valley of California

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We investigated the partial physiological resistance (PPR) of common beans (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) to white mold disease caused by Sclerotinia sclerotiorum (Lib.) deBary. The activity of phenylalanine ammonia-lyase (PAL) was measured in detached stems inoculated with a growing mycelium of the pathogen. Noninoculated detached stems and whole plants were included as controls. Five bean cultivars-Upland, Bunsi, Sierra, UI-114, and Montcalm-and one breeding line-NY 5394-were tested; all varied in PPR to white mold disease. Greater PAL activity in the resistant NY 5394 than in the susceptible `Upland' suggests that PAL activity may be involved in the PPR of common beans to S. sclerotiorum.

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White mold, also called Sclerotinia stem rot, is caused by the fungus Sclerotinia sclerotiorum . This necrotrophic pathogen can infect over 400 species of plants from 75 families, including monocotyledons and dicotyledons and herbaceous and woody

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.A. Matheron, M.E. Pryor, B.M. 2010 Effect of sclerotium density and irrigation on disease incidence and on efficacy of Coniothyrium minitans in suppressing lettuce drop caused by Sclerotinia sclerotiorum Plant Dis. 94 1118 1124 Clarkson, J.P. Fawcett, L

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Abstract

Increasing the amount of artificial support with wire fencing placed under the canopy of furrow-irrigated ‘Great Northern Valley’ dry beans (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) significantly decreased severity of white mold [Sclerotinia sclerotiorum (Lib.) deBary] and increased seed yield.

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Abstract

Celery (Apium graveolens L. var. dulce DC.) stored at 0°-1°C in 1.5% O2 had better marketable quality than that stored in air after 11 weeks. Marketable celery was improved by using 2.5-7.5% CO in the storage atmosphere, but not by 2-4% CO2. Decay was most severe on celery stored in 21% O2. Botrytis cinerea Pers. and Sclerotinia sclerotiorum (Lib.) de Bary were the most frequent isolates recovered from decayed celery.

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A laboratory procedure was tested to determine whether excised stems would allow a reliable indication of partial physiological resistance (PPR) to white mold [Sclerotinia sclerotiorum (Lib.) deBary] in dry bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.). Excised stems from 11- and 28-day-old plants were inoculated with growing mycelium of S. sclerotiorum, incubated for 4 to 7 days (11- and 28-day assays, respectively), then assayed for lesion length (LL). A total of 15 bean genotypes were screened for PPR, as indicated by LL. Significant (P < 0.05) differences among LL means of small- and medium-seeded bean genotypes were detected in the 28-day assay, whereas only LL means among medium-seeded genotypes. differed significantly (P < 0.05) in the n-day assay. `Bunsi', `C-20', `Sierra', `Topaz', and snap bean breeding lines NY 5262, NY 5394, and NY 5403 had the highest PPR and `Upland', D76125, and `UI-114' the lowest. The results from both assays were repeatable. A moderately high correlation (r = 0.68, P < 0.02) was observed between PPR and field resistance. The 28-day assay has potential for evaluating dry bean germplasm for PPR to white mold disease caused by S. sclerotiorum. A 28-day assay also was used to measure virulence of 18 isolates of S. sclerotiorum. The 18 isolates did not differ (P < 0.05) for virulence when measured by LL. The lack of any genotype × isolate interaction for LL indicated lack of host-pathogen specificity.

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Abstract

‘Monument’, a small, white dry bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) has been released to fulfill a need in western Nebraska for a cultivar maturing earlier than small, white ‘Aurora’, thereby reducing the risk of freeze damage in early fall frosts, and having an upright plant habit and less dense canopy, facilitating harvesting and reducing white mold disease (Sclerotinia sclerotiorum (Lib.) de Bary) (1, 2). The new cultivar is named in honor of the Scottsbluff National Monument, a historic site along the Oregon Trail, which is near the center of the Nebraska bean growing area in the North Platte Valley.

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. Plant pathogens. The plant pathogenic microbes tested were commonly found in greenhouse crops: F. foetens, R. solani, S. sclerotiorum, P. intermedium, P. ultimum , and Phytophthora cryptogea . Before inoculation, F. foetens, R. solani , and S

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