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Yanmei Zhang, Xuelin Shen, Xiaoqin Sun, Jia Liu, Yifeng Xia, Xin Zou, and Yueyu Hang

, several RAPD molecular markers, a nuclear gene APETALA2 ( AP2 ), and the chloroplast gene trnL-F have proved to be capable of distinguishing T. natans and T. incisa (Jiang and Ding, 2004; Kim et al., 2010 ). Comparing with the interspecies

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Salih Kafkas and Rafael Perl-Treves

Phylogenetic relationships among nine species in the genus Pistacia were studied by randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) analysis. The following species were included: P. atlantica, P. terebinthus, P. eurycarpa, P. vera, P. integerrima, P. mexicana, P. palaestina, P. lentiscus, and P. khinjuk. Genomic DNA was extracted from leaf tissue and RAPD analysis was performed using 20 primers. A total of 242 fragments were generated and 228 bands were polymorphic at the inter-specific level. Subjecting these data to phylogenetic analysis yielded a shortest cladogram that is 338 steps long, featuring two main groups. P. vera, P. khinjuk, P. eurycarpa, P. atlantica, and P. integerrima were included in one group, while P. terebinthus, P. palaestina, P. mexicana, and P. lentiscus formed the second group. The first group included species with single-trunked and big trees, whereas the species included in the second group mostly grow as shrubs or small trees. The cladogram showed that the closest pairs of species were P. terebinthus and P. palaestina, P. eurycarpa and P. atlantica, P. vera and P. khinjuk, and P. mexicana and P. lentiscus. We suggest that P. palaestina is in fact a variety of P. terebinthus in view of the small genetic distance between them. This study also showed that P. eurycarpa (syn. P. atlantica var. kurdica) is a distinct species from P. atlantica, rather than a variety within the same species.

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J.A. López-Valenzuela, O. Martínez, and O. Paredes-López

Fifteen mango cultivars were examined using randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) markers with decamer primers of arbitrary sequence. Thirteen of the 40 primers screened were informative and 109 amplified DNA bands were selected as RAPD markers. Specific RAPD markers for some mango cultivars were identified. Cluster analysis based on the 109 RAPD markers produced a dendrogram of the genetic relatedness of the 15 mango cultivars. `Manila' and `Carabao' were the most similar, which is in good agreement with their putative pedigrees. The four major bifurcations in the dendrogram separated correctly the genotypes into four groups according to their geographic origin. Bulk segregant analysis of polyembryonic and monoembryonic cultivars detected a specific RAPD marker for polyembryony. These markers may facilitate the management of mango germplasm for breeding purposes.

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Mehmet Nuri Nas, Nedim Mutlu, and Paul E. Read

RAPD and phenotypic analysis were conducted to assess clonal stability of hazelnuts generated from axillary buds cultured in vitro for long-term. The nuts produced on in vitro-propagated plants were indistinguishable from those of donor plants. With the exception of rare horizontal (plagiotropic) growth, all in vitro-propagated plants exhibited phenotypes similar to those of donor plants. RAPD analysis did not reveal any somaclonal variation between donor plants from which in vitro cultures were initiated and micropropagated plants (6-year cultures), and no somaclonal variation was detected among in vitro-propagated plants. However, polymorphism (15.6%) was detected between the parent plant and its in vitro-propagated progenies (from seedlings). These results show a good discriminatory power of RAPD to detect polymorphism between samples where it is expected, and it can be effectively used for genetic assessment of micropropagated hazelnut. No evidence of genetic or epigenetic changes was observed in long-term cultured hazelnut, and thus long-term in vitro culture of hazelnut does not seem to limit its clonal propagation.

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Jing-Tian Ling, Roger Sauve, and Nick Gawel

98 POSTER SESSION 14 (Abstr. 659-684) Genetics/RAPD/QTL

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Catherine M. Ronning, Raymond J. Schnell, and Shmuel Gazit

98 POSTER SESSION 14 (Abstr. 659-684) Genetics/RAPD/QTL

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N. Georgelis, J.W. Scott, and E.A. Baldwin

Small-fruited cherry tomato accession PI 270248 (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill. var. cerasiforme Dunal) with high fruit sugars was crossed to large-fruited inbred line Fla.7833-1-1-1 (7833) that had normal (low) fruit sugar. Sugars in the F2 were positively correlated with soluble solids, glucose, fructose, pH, and titratable acidity, and inversely correlated with fruit size. Earliness was not significantly correlated with sugars but was negatively correlated with fruit size. Thus, the lack of a sugar-earliness correlation indirectly indicates a trend for early tomato plants to be lower in sugars than later maturing plants. Sugars were not correlated with yield or pedicel type. Fruit from indeterminate plants had significantly more sugars than from determinate plants. Six random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) markers linked to high sugars were found, five dominant (OPAE 4, UBC 731, UBC 744, UBC 489, UBC 290) and one co-dominant (UBC 269). Five of the markers were also linked to small fruit size and one of these also was linked to low yield (UBC 290). The sixth marker (UBC 269) was linked to indeterminate plant habit. UBC 731, UBC 489, and possibly OPAE 4 were in one linkage group, while UBC 744 and UBC 290 were in another linkage group. Combinations of all the markers together explained 35% of the sugar variation in the F2 grown in Spring 2002.

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A. Fabbri, J.I. Hormaza, and V.S. Polito

98 POSTER SESSION 14 (Abstr. 659-684) Genetics/RAPD/QTL

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Unaroj Boonprakob and David H. Byrne

98 POSTER SESSION 14 (Abstr. 659-684) Genetics/RAPD/QTL

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J.I. Hormaza, L. Dollo, and V.S. Polito

98 POSTER SESSION 14 (Abstr. 659-684) Genetics/RAPD/QTL