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Abstract

Intensity of needle coloration for inbred seedlings of Picea pungens Engelm. (blue spruce) increased with seedling age. Needle color ratings for 7- and 10-year-old, inbred seedlings and parental trees were correlated. Mean heights of the 10-year-old, inbred progenies ranged from 50 to 76 cm, but bore no relationship to parental selffertility or needle color. In one selection, 94% of the inbred seedlings had silvery-blue foliage.

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During the past few years, unusual winter temperature patterns have caused serious damage to Colorado blue spruce ( Picea pungens ) and Fraser fir [ Abies fraseri (Pursh) Poir] in mid-Michigan nursery and Christmas tree plantations. Damages

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plasticulture technology and other weed control techniques on growth, photosynthetic gas exchange, water relations, and nutrition of newly planted seedlings of fraser fir [ Abies fraseri (Pursh) Poir.] and colorado blue spruce ( Picea pungens Engelm.), two

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Abstract

Picea pungens Englm. trees were treated with a single foliar spray of solutions containing 0, 100, 250, 500, and 1000 mM BA at 4 different times as follows during the growing season: 1) dormant trees, 2) at bud break, 3) during stem elongation, 4) summer hardwood, and 5) summer hardwood combined with a pruning. Treatments of 1000 mM at the time of bud break and to pruned summer hardwood trees resulted in an increase in bud number but not a corresponding increase in branch number the following year.

Open Access

) using an 80:20 (v:v) mix of pine bark and peatmoss (Renewed Earth, Inc., Kalamazoo, MI). Container capacity of the media was 44.5%. The four species used were Fraser fir [ Abies fraseri (Pursh) Poir.], Colorado blue spruce ( Picea pungens Engelm. var

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the winter months (Dec. 2006 through Mar. 2007) was −1 °C with a minimum of −22 °C ( MAWN, 2007 ). Plant material In May 2006, 90 seedlings (2 + 2 or plug + 2) each of Abies fraseri (Pursh) Poir., Picea glauca var. densata , P. pungens

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-grown, spade-dug Picea pungens (colorado blue spruce) in the lower midwestern and upper midwestern United States (hardiness zones 6a to 7a) and to analyze the contributions of system components. The scope included the production system from seed to the farm

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mulch bed. Finally, growth of terminal leaders was also measured for two growing seasons after 2003 trees were transplanted into a managed landscape. Materials and Methods Field-grown Colorado spruce trees ( Picea pungens Engelm.) 1.5 to 1.8 m

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Abstract

A whole-tree foliar application of BA at a concentration of 1000 ppm increased lateral bud density on douglas-fir [Pseudotsuga menziesii (Mirb.) Franco] but not on Colorado blue spruce (Picea pungens Englm.) when treated ≈6 weeks after budbreak. A single BA application made at the same time, but only to the terminal leader, was not effective in increasing overall lateral bud density on either the terminal or lateral branches of either species. Lammas shoots formed on all trees that received whole-tree applications of BA. Bud formation on lammas shoots appeared normal for douglas-fir but uncharacteristic for Colorado blue spruce. Chemical names used: N- (phenylmethyl)-lH-purin-6-amine (BA).

Open Access

Abstract

Needle starch metabolism was studied during graft development of Colorado blue spruce (Picea pungens Englemann ‘Hoopsi’) scions on Norway spruce [Picea abies (L.) Karst] rootstocks. Starch accumulated during the initial stages of union formation, but the rate of accumulation slowed over time. Peak starch content in developing greenhouse grafts was ≈30% and, in lath house grafts, ≈50% of that in 3-year-old grafts forced in the greenhouse. Prior to budbreak, starch content declined rapidly, stabilizing at pre-grafting levels during shoot elongation. Grafts with misaligned unions accumulated starch during the first week, but the starch content then declined. Preventing photosynthesis in scions during union formation prevented starch accumulation, but did not affect graft success or subsequent scion growth. We concluded that neither starch accumulation nor current photosynthesis in the scion were required during union development.

Open Access