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Passionfruit ( Passiflora sp.) originated from South American countries, but this crop is gaining interest around the world ( Ulmer et al. 2004 ; Vanderplank 2000 ). As the fruit and associated value-added products gain popularity, there will be

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Genus Passiflora L. belongs to the family Passifloraceae A.L. de Jussieu ex Kunth and includes species known as passion fruit ( Passiflora edulis Sims) or passion flowers. Brazil constitutes one of the largest centers of genetic diversity for

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Passiflora is a large genus that comprises numerous species. It is primarily a tropical crop, grown in regions with mild winter temperatures; however, there are temperate and subtropical Passiflora species, most of which are exclusively known

Open Access

Fruit growth and composition of commercial passion fruit types and maypop were compared. Fruit growth (diameter) of purple passion fruit (Passiflora edulis Sims.) and maypop (P. incarnata L.) followed a sigmoidal growth curve. Passion fruit were larger than both greenhouse-grown and wild maypop fruit. Wild maypop produced larger fruit compared to greenhouse grown maypop. Yellow passion fruit had the lowest percentage pulp and the highest soluble solids. Greenhouse-grown maypop had the lowest soluble solids. Purple and yellow passion fruit had lower juice pH than maypop. Wild maypop fruit had the highest sucrose and purple passion fruit had the lowest. Yellow and purple passion fruit juice had higher fructose and glucose than did maypop juice.

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Two species of Passiflora, P. edulis f. edulis (purple passion fruit) and P. edulis f. flavicarpa (yellow passion fruit), and P. incarnata (maypop), were evaluated for acclimation and cold hardiness, using differential thermal analysis, electrolyte leakage and the tetrazolium stain test. The two species showed the capacity to acclimate several degrees during the evaluation period and the three tests gave similar lethal temperatures for the two species; –9C to –10C for yellow passion fruit, –10C to –12C for purple passion fruit and –11C to –13C for maypop. Purple and yellow passion fruit were also assayed for survival after a freeze-thaw cycle, using a tissue culture regeneration technique called “feeder plate”. Yellow passion fruit did not show the capacity to regenerate at any of the temperatures used (0, –3, –6C). Purple passion fruit showed callus formation even at the lowest temperature (–6C).

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this region and have been used for fresh fruit, juice, seasoning, and medicines. The main cultivated fruit species are Passiflora alata Dryander, P. antioquensis Karst., P. cumbalensis (Karst.) Harms, P. edulis Sims, P. ligularis Juss., P

Open Access

In the United States, passion fruit ( Passiflora sp.) production is slowly starting to take off. From 2012 to 2017, respectively, the number of farms producing passion fruit more than doubled in number from 153 farms to 364 farms, with the total

Open Access

Passiflora is an important ornamental genus, mainly within tropical zones. However, two cold-hardy, North American Passiflora species exist. Previous work has been done to incorporate these species into breeding programs with some success. The intent of this study was to evaluate the extent of genetic diversity among five different Passiflora genotypes, including the two native North American species, P. incarnata L. and P. lutea L. Results indicate low genetic similarity among all genotypes with none at 50% or greater. P. incarnata and the ornamental cultivar `Lady Margaret' displayed the highest relationship at 49%. P. incarnata averaged 35.5% similarity with the other genotypes and P. lutea was 29.5%. Average overall similarity among all genotypes was 31.1%. These and other results show that the Passiflora genus has a high degree of genetic variation and breeding efforts could expand interest within North America.

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Abstract

Leaf, stem, and tendril explants of Passiflora suberosa flowered in vitro on a basal medium containing Murashige and Skoog salts plus 3% sucrose, glycine, and vitamins. The most effective flowering treatment was achieved with stem explants from the shoot apex cultured with 0.1 mg/liter 6-benzylamino purine (BA) in light. Flowering occurred in as few as 21 days. Shoot formation required only a 1-day exposure to BA but flowering required a 3-day exposure. Explants of leaves and stems obtained from below node 5 remained vegetative. Combined culture of basal and apical leaf discs did not alter flowering ability. Leaf discs recultured from in vitro flowering shoots formed only vegetative shoots, suggesting exhaustion of a flower-inducing substance in culture. Explants from juvenile plants formed only vegetative shoots.

Open Access

Fruit growth (diameter) of purple passion fruit (Passiflora edulis Sims.) and maypop (P. incarnata L.) followed a sigmoidal growth curve. Passion fruit were larger than either greenhouse-grown or wild maypop fruit. Wild maypop produced larger fruit than greenhouse-grown maypop. Yellow passion fruit had the lowest percentage of pulp and the highest soluble solids concentration (SSC) and greenhouse-grown maypop had the lowest SSC among the four groups tested. Purple and yellow passion fruit had lower juice pH than maypop. Wild maypop fruit had the highest sucrose content and purple passion fruit had the lowest. Yellow and purple passion fruit juice had higher fructose and glucose contents than did maypop juice.

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