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93 POSTER SESSION 11 (Abstr. 159–188) Crop Physiology Tuesday, 25 July, 1:00–2:00 p.m.

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of mugwort. Mesotrione and topramezone impede carotenoid biosynthesis by inhibiting the enzyme p -HPPD ( Norris et al., 1998 ). Mesotrione is registered for preemergence (PRE) and POST applications in corn and turfgrass ( BASF, 2013 ; Mitchell et al

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Heavy P fertilization of vegetable crops in the Salinas Valley of California have increased soil P levels, with > 50 mg·kg-1 bicarbonate-extractable P (Pbc) now common. To evaluate the response of lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.) to P fertilization in fields with elevated soil P levels, 12 trials were conducted in commercial fields during 2002-2003. Pbc at the trial sites varied from 53-171 mg·kg-1. In each trial four replicate plots receiving the growers' P application were compared with paired plots in which no P was applied. Leaf P was monitored at cupping stage and at harvest. At harvest mean whole plant mass and % of marketable plants were recorded. The correlation of Pbc to bioavailable P (Pba) was evaluated using 30 representative Salinas Valley soils; Pbc varied among these soils from 15-177 mg·kg-1. Pba was estimated by P adsorption on an anion resin membrane during a 16 h incubation. The effect of temperature on P bioavailability in 6 of these soils was estimated by conducting the Pba incubation at 5, 15 and 25 °C. A significant increase in lettuce yield with P fertilization was achieved at only one trial site, a spring planting where Pbc was 54 mg kg-1 ; at all other sites, including 3 with Pbc < 60 mg kg-1, P application resulted in no agronomic benefit. P application resulted in only a marginal increase in plant P uptake. Pba was highly correlated with Pbc (r = 0.89). Pba increased approximately 40% across soils with each 10 °C increase in soil temperature.

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Five field experiments were conducted from 1986 to 1989 to compare broadcast and band P fertilization of crisphead lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.) on Histosols. Rates of P were 0, 50, 100, 200, and 300 kg P/ha applied broadcast or banded. Broadcast P was surface-applied and disked into the soil 1 day before bedding and planting. Banded P was placed in strips 8 cm wide, 5 cm below the lettuce seeds at planting. Lettuce yields were significantly(P < 0.01) increased by P rate in all experiments. However, significant rate-by -placement interactions indicated that response of lettuce to P varied by placement. Lettuce yields were generally optimized with a band P rate one-third of that required with broadcast placement. Analysis of soil samples collected in the lettuce bed after fertilization indicated that banded P increased available P in the lettuce root zone compared to broadcast fertilization. Lettuce leaf P concentration increased with P rate and generally was greater when P was banded. The critical concentration of P in lettuce leaf tissue at the six- to eight-leaf stage was 0.37%. Banding P fertilizer did not reduce the availability of other essential nutrients, as indicated by tissue analysis.

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Experiments were conducted to determine the optimum levels of N and P for use in greenhouse cucumber (Cucumis sativus L. `Vetomil') production. Plants were grown in rockwool slabs using a double-stem pruning method. Treatment 1 plants were fed 90 ppm N until N in the growing slabs was depleted (averaged <10 ppm); N was then increased to 175 ppm. Treatment 2 and 3 plants were given a constant 175 or 225 ppm N, respectively. Plants in all treatments depleted N in the slabs by three to four weeks after transplant (WAT); N remained low in Treatment 1, but recovered to adequate levels in Treatments 2 and 3. Phosphorus was provided at a constant 50 ppm and was depleted to <10 ppm in the slabs of all three treatments by four WAT. Fruit yield increased significantly with each increase in solution N. Similar results in a second trial indicated that N and/or P may have been limiting factors even at the highest levels tested. Research will continue to determine optimum levels of N and P for maximizing yield.

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1 To whom reprint requests should be addressed. Current address: Ovens Research Station, P.O. Box 235, Myrtleford, VIC 3737, Australia. E-mail address: Audrey.Gerber@nre.vic.gov.au 2 Associate Professor. 3 Professor. This paper is a portion

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western Oregon use foliar sprays of B (often mixed with fungicides) early in the season or postharvest to ensure that vines are not limited by this nutrient. Foliar sprays of macronutrients [nitrogen (N), phosphorus (P), potassium (K) calcium (Ca

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Application of high rates of P in the year of planting increased the number of flower clusters and fruit set the subsequent year on newly planted `Macspur McIntosh', `Summerland Red McIntosh', `Jonagold', and `Jonamac' apple (Malus domestica Borkh.) on dwarfing rootstock (M.26 and M.9) in three separate experiments. The effect occurred whether P was applied at rates of 36 or 48 g P/tree as granular monoammonium phosphate (11 N-23.6 P-0K) uniformly mixed with 100 or 180 liter of soil in the planting hole or at rates of 17.5 and 35 g P applied as soluble ammonium polyphosphate (10N-14.6P-0K) with the irrigation water. A leaf P concentration range between 0.20% and 0.36% was associated with the acceleration of fruiting.

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Oral Session 10—Floriculture 2 28 July 2006, 10:00 a.m.–12:00 p.m. Bayside A Moderator: Ying-Tung Wang

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trees were not nutrient limited, and following optimum industry recommendations, trees received annual NPKB fertigation. N was fertigated daily as calcium nitrate (15.5N–0P–0K) for 6 weeks after bloom to provide 75 g N/tree. Subsequent research indicated

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