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Neil O. Anderson, Peter D. Ascher, Vincent Fritz, Charlie Rohwer, Steven Poppe, Shengrui Yao, Patricia Johnson, Lee Klossner, Neal S. Eash, Barbara E. Liedl, and Judith Reith-Rozelle

produced onshore. Origin The pedigree of MN 98-89-7 ( Fig. 1 ) is the result of a series of outcrosses of hybrid descendants of the original cross in 1989 between two allohexaploid (2 n = 6 x = 54) species, C. weyrichii (Maxi.) Miyabe ‘Pink Bomb’ ( http

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Constantinos Tzerakis, Dimitrios Savvas, Nick Sigrimis, and Georgios Mavrogiannopoulos

nutrient and water uptake by plants. Based on research carried out in The Netherlands, De Kreij et al. (1999) and Sonneveld and Voogt (2009) published recommendations for Mn and Zn levels in NS used in closed hydroponic crops of cucumber to compensate

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Joseph P. Albano

Soluble fertilizers are typically formulated with metal-aminopolycarboxylic acids [APCA (i.e., chelating agents)] of Cu, Fe, Mn, and Zn. These metal–APCA complexes, however, are also applied as single-metal chelate solutions to foliage, soil

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J.M. Spiers and J.H. Braswell

The effects of varying Al, Mn, and Ca fertilization levels on `Tifblue' and `Brightwell' rabbiteye blueberry (Vaccinium ashei Reade) plant growth, chlorosis symptoms, and leaf elemental content were studied in a sand culture experiment. Increased Al fertilization linearly decreased Ca, Mg, and Mn leaf concentrations and plant vigor. Calcium fertilization did not affect plant growth or leaf concentration of the two cultivars. Increased Mn fertilization increased Al and Mn leaf concentrations and resulted in more chlorosis symptoms. Plants fertilized with the highest rates of Al and Mn had the least amount of growth.

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Alan W. Meerow and Timothy K. Broschat

Anatomical differences in leaves of queen palm [Syagrus romanzoffiana (Chamisso) Glassman] showing visible K, Mn, and Fe deficiency symptoms are described. Potassium-deficient leaves showed less organization in the mesophyll than healthy leaves. Adaxial fibers increased in diameter. Chloroplast frequency was reduced overall, but most severely in areas of the leaf showing gross symptoms of the deficiency. Manganese-deficient leaves had reduced chloroplast frequency, especially in tissue near necrotic areas, and thicker and more fibers per unit length. Iron-deficient leaves had few chloroplasts throughout the mesophyll, and also thicker and more fibers per unit length.

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Neil O. Anderson, Peter D. Ascher, Vincent Fritz, Charlie Rohwer, Steven Poppe, Shengrui Yao, Patricia Johnson, Lee Klossner, and Neal Eash

chrysanthemums [$11.497 million (w)] (USDA NASS, 2015). The groundcover habit, exemplified by MN Sel’n. 90-275-27, is a genetically controlled, stable trait without the need for plant growth regulator or other chemical applications or hand manipulation to achieve

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Michael D. Frost, Janet C. Cole, and John M. Dole

Improving the quality of water released from containerized production nurseries and greenhouse operations is an increasing concern in many areas of the United States. The potential pollution threat to our ground and potable water reservoirs via the horticultural industry needs to receive attention from growers and researchers alike. `Orbit Red' geraniums were grown in 3:1 peat:perlite medium with microtube irrigation to study the effect of fertilizer source on geranium growth, micronutrient leaching, and nutrient distribution. Manufacturer's recommended rates of controlled-release (CRF) and water-soluble fertilizers (WSF) were used to fulfill the micronutrient requirement of the plants. Minimal differences in all growth parameters measured between WSF and CRF were determined. A greater percentage of Fe was leached from the WSF than CRF. In contrast, CRF had a greater percentage of Mn leached from the system than WRF during the experiment. Also, regardless of treatment, the upper and middle regions of the growing medium had a higher nutrient concentration than the lower region of medium.

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M.R. Johanson and C.F. Williams

We conducted a preliminary field study that examines the accumulation of Pb, Cd, Zn, Mn, and Cu in plants and soil along a roadway in Zion National Park. The study is designed to determine the effects of motor traffic on the accumulation of these heavy metals in various plant species and soil during 1 year and to determine if these accumulations decrease as you move away from the roadway. Preliminary results indicate that the amount of Pb, Cd, Zn, Mn, and Cu concentrations found are a function of the number of vehicles passing during a year and the distance from the roadway. Higher concentrations of these heavy metals are found in areas close to the road and in areas where traffic is moving slowly or even stopped. The heavy metal concentrations decreased as the distance from the roadway increased, and the speed of passing vehicles increased.

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Joseph P. Albano and William B. Miller

Marigold (Tagetes erecta L.) grown hydroponically in an irradiated nutrient solution containing FeDTPA had root ferric reductase activity 120% greater, foliar Fe level 33% less, and foliar Mn level 90% greater than did plants grown in an identical, nonirradiated solution, indicating that the plants growing in the irradiated solution were responding to Fe-deficiency stress with physiological reactions associated with Fe efficiency. The youngest leaves of plants grown in the irradiated solution had symptoms of Mn toxicity (interveinal chlorosis, shiny-bronze necrotic spots, and leaf deformation). Plants grown in irradiated solution in which the precipitated Fe was replaced with fresh Fechelate were, in general, no different from those grown in the nonirradiated solution. Chemical name used: ferric diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (FeDTPA).

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Joseph P. Albano and William B. Miller

Our objective was to determine the effects on plant growth and physiology that a photodegraded Fe-chelate containing lab-prepared nutrient solution would have when used in plant culture. Plants grown hydroponically in the irradiated Fe-DTPA containing nutrient solution had ferric reductase activity 2.2 times greater, foliar Fe level 0.77 times less, and foliar Mn level 1.9 times greater than in plants grown in an identical but non-irradiated solution, indicating that plants growing in the irradiated solution were responding to Fe deficiency stress with physiological reactions associated with Fe efficiency. The youngest leaves of plants that were grown in the irradiated solution had symptoms of Mn toxicity. Restoration of the irradiated solution by removing the precipitated Fe by centrifugation and adding fresh Fe-chelate resulted in plants that were, in general, not different from those grown in the non-irradiated solution (control).