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The coat protein (CP) gene of lettuce big-vein associated virus (LBVaV) in sense or antisense orientation in a binary vector pBI121 was transformed via Agrobacterium tumefaciens (Smith and Towns.) Conn. mediated transformation into lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.) to generate LBVaV-resistant lettuce. Nineteen T1 lines were produced; five to 10 plants of each T1 line were inoculated with LBVaV using Olpidium brassicae (Wor.) Dang.; and LBVaV was not detected in eight plants derived from six lines. T2 seedlings from the eight plants were tested for LBVaV resistance, and one line (line A-2) with the CP gene in antisense orientation was resistant to LBVaV while the other lines were susceptible. The transgenic line A-2 was also resistant to mirafiori lettuce virus (MiLV) and big-vein expressions regardless of the presence or absence of LBVaV.

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heads. Big vein is caused by a virus, vectored by the soil-borne fungus Olpidium brassicae (Woronin) P.A. Dang ( Jagger and Chandler, 1934 ). The disease-causing virus is reported to be Mirafiori Lettuce Big Vein Virus (MLBVV) ( Lot et al., 2002

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by Mirafiori lettuce big-vein virus ), and tipburn (physiological disorder) ( Davis et al., 1997 ). Data were analyzed using JMP 6.0.3 (SAS Institute, Cary, NC) and Tukey's honestly significant difference test. Disease resistance. All plants

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yellows virus ( Maisonneuve et al., 1991 ) and Mirafiori lettuce big vein virus (R. Hayes and W. M. Wintermantel, unpublished data). The initial successful transfer of the Nr gene from L. virosa to cultivated lettuce was a major accomplishment that

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susceptible to the calcium deficiency-related disorder tipburn (data not shown; see Ryder, 1999 , for a review of tipburn in lettuce), partially resistant to the disease big-vein caused by the soilborne virus Mirafiori lettuce big-vein virus ( Ryder and

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