Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 46 items for :

  • Mexican petunia x
Clear All

large genus ( Daniel et al., 1984 , 1990 ; Daniel and Chuang, 1993 ). The most commonly found Ruellia species in southeastern U.S. gardens is Ruellia simplex (britton’s petunia, mexican petunia, or mexican bluebell). Scientific names for this plant

Free access

, and three non-native species are listed as naturalized in the state: R. blechum L., R. ciliatiflora Hook, and R. simplex Wright ( Wunderlin and Hansen, 2012 ). In past years, R. simplex (commonly known as mexican petunia, mexican bluebell, or

Free access

of Mexican petunia [ Ruellia simplex ( Freyre et al. 2012a )] and lantana [ Lantana strigocamara ( Czarnecki et al. 2012 ; Deng et al. 2017 , 2020 )]. Methodology of these studies included trialing of selections at two to three locations in

Open Access

( Cyperus esculentus ). Since ≈2015, a weed species in the nightshade family (Solanaceae)—seaside petunia [ Calibrachoa parviflora (synonym Petunia parviflora )]—has become increasingly abundant in New Mexico onion fields. Seaside petunia ( Fig. 1 ) was

Open Access

Invasive species have disrupted thousands of acres of natural areas in Florida and appear to have a physiological competitive advantage over native species. The influence of light and temperature on germination was determined for the invasive Mexican petunia (Ruellia tweediana Griseb.) and native wild petunia (Ruellia caroliniensis Steud.). Seeds were collected and germinated in incubators with light or darkness at 15, 24, 33, and 30/20 °C. Light increased germination for each species, except at 15 °C (R. caroliniensis). For R. caroliniensis, highest germination (86% to 94%) occurred at 33 °C and 30/20 °C. Highest germination of R. tweediana (98% to 100%) occurred at 30/20 °C. Studies also were initiated to determine if R. tweediana has a competitive advantage over the native species when grown under wet and dry substrate conditions. Growth and development measurements after 8 weeks under controlled conditions revealed that R. tweediana grown in wet conditions had the greatest dry weight increase as compared to other treatments. Ruellia caroliniensis had higher specific leaf area when grown in wet or dry conditions, as compared to R. tweediana. Throughout the experiment, net CO2 assimilation of R. caroliniensis grown under dry or wet conditions was consistently lower than that of R. tweediana. Shoot nitrogen and phosphorus use efficiencies were generally greatest for R. tweediana plants grown in wet conditions. For shoot nutrient content, significant species × moisture interactions occurred for measured phosphorus (P) and calcium (Ca). When grown in wet conditions, R. tweediana had less shoot P and Ca as compared to dry conditions. For root nutrient content, species × moisture interactions were insignificant for each measured nutrient, with the exception of potassium (K). Potassium use efficiency of R. tweediana roots grown in wet conditions was higher than that of R. tweediana grown in dry conditions and R. caroliniensis grown in wet conditions.

Free access

bedding plants transplanted during week 14 in HTs to a GH revealed that dianthus ( D. chinensis ), petunia ( Petunia × hybrida ), and pansy ( Viola ×cornuta ) could be produced in an HT with little to no delay in time to flower. For example, dianthus

Free access

petunia ( R. ciliatiflora ), shrubby wild petunia ( R. dipteracanthus ), and mexican petunia ( R. simplex )—with shrubby wild petunia occurring very rarely (only vouchered in one county) and mexican petunia being categorized as a Category 1 invasive by

Open Access
Authors: and

widespread and morphologically highly variable taxon here recognized as Ruellia simplex Wright (“Britton’s Petunia,” “Mexican Petunia,” or “Mexican Bluebell”). Scientific names for this plant that have been used throughout the botanical and horticultural

Free access

point of 18 to 21 °C in Tippecanoe, IN ( Currey et al., 2014 ; Gerovac et al., 2015 ). Consequently, time to flower (TTF) of ‘Telstar Crimson’ dianthus ( Dianthus chinensis ), ‘Wave Pink’ petunia, and ‘Liberty Classic Yellow’ snapdragon ( Antirrhinum

Full access

) found that impatiens and zonal geranium were more tolerant to sublethal rates of triclopyr and 2,4-D but that african marigold, petunia, and wax begonia were more sensitive to these herbicide treatments. Reduced flowering was also observed with

Open Access