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Hiroshi Hamamoto and Keisuke Yamazaki

found an SDP that reacts to blue light in the same way as C. allionii in Funke's study. Malvaceae (the mallow family) is more closely related to the Cruciferae than the families of the plants used in any of the previous studies as judged by

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Cecil T. Pounders

. Blanchard (Malvaceae) ( Small, 2004 ). A number of additional taxa associated with H. moscheutos have been variously recognized historically as varieties, subspecies, or distinct species. Primary among these are Hibiscus moscheutos subsp. palustris L

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Dariusz P. Malinowski, Robert S. Brown and William E. Pinchak

Winter-hardy hibiscuses are herbaceous perennials in the mallow (Malvaceae) family that belong to six species native to the United States: H. coccineus Walter (scarlet rose mallow), H. dasycalyx S.F Blake and Shiller (Neches River rose mallow

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Dariusz P. Malinowski, Robert S. Brown and William E. Pinchak

Winter-hardy hibiscuses are herbaceous, shrub-like perennials in the mallow (Malvaceae) family that belong to six species native to the United States and southern Canada ( Lawton, 2004 ; Winters, 1970 ). They grow naturally in marshy habitats

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Olga A. Kildisheva, R. Kasten Dumroese and Anthony S. Davis

Munro's globemallow [ Sphaeralcea munroana (Douglas) Spach] (Malvaceae), a herbaceous perennial endemic to the Great Basin of western North America, is an important candidate for use in horticulture and restoration. This species is able to tolerate

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Mike L. Grant, Diana M. Miller and Alastair Culham

Knowledge of the origin of Lavatera L. (tree mallows) cultivars helps to predict their cultural requirements. Eighteen accessions representing 15 cultivars, 14 accessions of 7 species, and 5 accessions of an F1 hybrid between the putative parents of the cultivars were sampled for morphological variation and for randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) fingerprint variation. Species-specific molecular markers were identified from the RAPD profiles. Chimeral elements were not distinguishable by RAPD analysis. Principal component analysis identified the majority of the cultivars to be selections of hybrid origin, probably from a narrow genetic base. Two cultivars were derived directly from individual species. The resolving power of RAPD markers and morphology was similar although RAPD data offered greater ability to ascribe parentage while morphology offered optimal discrimination of cultivar selections.

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Ryan M. Warner and John E. Erwin

Thirty-six Hibiscus L. species were grown for 20 weeks under three lighting treatments at 15, 20, or 25 ± 1.5 °C air temperature to identify flowering requirements for each species. In addition, species were subjectively evaluated to identify those species with potential ornamental significance based on flower characteristics and plant form. Lighting treatments were 9 hour ambient light (St. Paul, Minn., November to May, 45 °N), ambient light plus a night interruption using incandescent lamps (2 μmol·m-2·s-1; 2200 to 0200 hr), or ambient light plus 24-hour supplemental lighting from high-pressure sodium lamps (100 μmol·m-2·s-1). Five day-neutral, six obligate short-day, six facultative short-day, three obligate long-day, and one facultative long-day species were identified. Fifteen species did not flower. Temperature and lighting treatments interacted to affect leaf number below the first flower and/or flower diameter on some species. Hibiscus acetosella Welw. ex Hiern, H. cisplatinus St.-Hil., H. radiatus Cav., and H. trionum L. were selected as potential new commercially significant ornamental species.

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Hsuan Chen, Lan Xue, Tong Li and Ryan N. Contreras

Hibiscus , a genus in the Malvaceae family, contains ≈300 species of trees, shrubs, and herbs with various growth habits. Due to their impressive flowers and long flowering season, many Hibiscus species have been used as ornamental plants. Most