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Hydrangea macrophylla is one of the most economically important nursery crops in the United States, with sales of Hydrangea species topping $120,000,000 in 2014 ( USDA-NASS, 2014 ). Although hydrangeas—prized for their large showy flowers and

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Hydrangea was systematically described by McClintock (1957) . She included 23 species with a disjunct distribution in both temperate and tropical regions of eastern Asia, eastern North America, and South America. Hydrangea macrophylla is the

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that are ornamentally attractive and commonly cultivated ( Kudo et al., 2008 ). Bigleaf hydrangea ( H . macrophylla ) is the most commonly cultivated member of the Hydrangeaceae family and is native to southern China and Japan ( McClintock, 1957

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Hydrangea macrophylla is a popular flowering shrub, widely used and commercially important in landscape horticulture ( Adkins et al., 2003 ). H. macrophylla is native to Japan ( McClintock, 1957 ) and thrives in maritime regions but grows and

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The Hydrangea genus consists of shrubs and vines with complex and polymorphous inflorescences. They are corymbiform in H. macrophylla and H. petiolaris and panicular in H. quercifolia and H. paniculata ( Bertrand, 1992 ). In Hydrangea

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The genus Hydrangea L. consists of ≈23 species and has an American-Asiatic distribution ( McClintock, 1957 ). Several species are cultivated as ornamentals, the most popular of which is H. macrophylla ( Dirr, 2004 ; van Gelderen and van

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throughout winter. The plant is estimated to be hardy to U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) Cold Hardiness Zone 7 ( Hinkley, 2005 ). Hydrangea macrophylla is the most popular member of the Hydrangeaceae. It is a small, deciduous shrub native to Japan

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Many cultivars of Hydrangea macrophylla produce inflorescences bearing sepal colors that reflect the soil pH; such sepals are pink-red when the shrub is grown in neutral to basic soils and blue when grown in acid soils. The primary pigment in

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.A. 2008 Micropropagation and tissue culture of Hydrangea macrophylla for mutagenesis, ploidy manipulation, and possible transformation HortScience 43 627 (abstr.) Henikoff, S. Comai, L. 2003 Single-nucleotide mutations for plant functional genomics Annu

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Hydrangea macrophylla is widely grown as both a landscape and florist plant. In the landscape, it is valued for its large, long-lasting inflorescences that are produced in early summer. As a florist's plant, it is usually forced into bloom for

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