Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 43 items for :

  • Hibiscus syriacus x
Clear All
Authors: , , and

This experiment was undertaken to characterize the physiological changes taking place during the petal senescence of Hibiscus syriacus. Five distinctive developmental stages were chronologically suggested. Flower bud dry weight increased almost linearly from Stage I to Stage IV at a rate of ≈15 mg/day. Fresh weight and fresh/dry weight ratio increased much more rapidly between Stage III and Stage IV than during the early stage of development. It showed that petal expansion was partially due to an increased water uptake. The highest osmolality (411 mmol) was found in the fully open flowers. During the subsequent senescence and collapse of the flower, from Stage IV to Stage V, there were a rapid loss of fresh and dry weight and the fall of fresh/dry weight ratio, corresponding to the wilting that characterizes early senescence. A rise in cell sap osmolality coincided with the increase in soluble sugar content and fresh/dry weight ratio, and with the expansion of Hibiscus syriacus petal. Therefore, buds at Stage III, where they are under physiological maturity, might be appropriate to harvest. Hibiscus syriacus flowers showed a small but respiratory peak at Stage IV. The maximum rate of respiration was obtained with fully open flowers (Stage IV), whereas ethylene production remained extremely low until the petals started to open. Ethylene production, ACC synthase, and ACC content increased as the fresh weight of the flowers started to decline. At Stage V, there were a loss of petal fresh weight and a considerable increase in ethylene production (9 nL/g per h). The results of the present study have shown that petal tissue at Stage IV, presenescent stage, was characterized by the increase of soluble sugar and fresh weight, which might be expected to lead to petal expansion and limit turgidity. ABA and the stomata on petal might promote the disorganization.

Free access

Hibiscus species are tropical, but Hibiscus syriacus is widely used in temperate regions due to its broad adaptability and variable ornamental characteristics. H. syriacus is the most commonly used hardy Hibiscus species in temperate to subtropical

Free access
Authors: , , and

This cultivar originated from a grafting mutant in grafted plants of a selected 100-year-old seedling of Hibiscus syriacus L. for 5 years. In 1999, the plant is named H. syriacus `Andong'. Hibiscus syriacus `Andong' is a deciduous, erect-growing, multiple-stemmed, dwarf type that, in 7 years, has grown 120 cm high and 65 cm wide, with dense branching to the base. It has more than 200 flowers in a 7-year-old tree. The alternate, leathery, waxy, dark green leaves are 5.3 cm long, 3.8 cm wide. But it is 0.48 mm thick and 34.42 mg/cm2 of fresh weight and then is thickier and heavier than that of other cultivars. Therefore, the plant is rarely damaged by aphids and is reliably hardy to -20 °C. The flowers are white with a prominent dark red eye spot that radiates along the veins to midpetal, 5-7 cm in diameter, and blooms profusely from July to October. Total flowering time of `Andong' was 36 h in both 1998 and 1999. It sets very little fruit. AIt does not only germinate by pollen, but also by seeds. This cultivar can be readily propagated by softwood (on 24 July with 7000 ppm IBA in the mist) or hardwood cutting (1000 ppm IBA) and by grafting on seedling H. syriacus understock.

Free access

Unlike most ornamental trees that bloom in spring, Hibiscus syriacus L. (Rose of Sharon), which is the national flower of Korea, has nearly 60 to 100 d of flowering time from early July to late October, and there are more than 350 varieties of

Open Access

In this experiment, the effects of salinity from 0.0%, 0.5%, 1.0%, and 5.0 % NaCl on Hibiscus syriacus L. and Hibiscus hamabo Sieb. & Zucc. seed germination with various temperature and Ca treatments was investigated in petri dishes with 10 ml of distilled water or with the appropriate saline solution. At 11 days after treatment, the highest germination rate was obtained at 20C with H. syriacus and 25C with H. hamabo without NaCl and Ca treatments. At 25C, only H. hamabo seeds germinated with 1% NaCl, with dry and fresh weight increasing as Ca concentration increased. With 0.5% NaCl treatment, the germination rate of H. hamabo and H. syriacus increased as Ca concentrations (0.0, 13.35, and 133.5 mM) increased. Without NaCl treatments, hypocotyl and leaf length and width of H. syriacus were longer than those of H. hamabo; with NaCl treatments, the inverse was true.

Free access

Salt injury was induced by 5% (w/v) NaCl drenching on Hibiscus hamabo Sieb. & Zucc. and H. syriacus L. seedlings. Total chlorophyll content of H. hamabo was higher than that of H. syriacus. Uniconazole (0.0, 0.5, 1.0, and 5.0 mg·liter–1) treatment increased and 25- or 50-mg·liter–1 GA3 treatment decreased chlorophyll content of H. hamabo. Total chlorophyll content of H. syriacus was not affected by uniconazole or GA3. Total carbohydrate content of H. syriacus was more accumulated than that of H. homabo. Total carbohydrate content of H. hamabo was more decreased than that of H. syriacus by Ca (13.35 or 133.5 mM), uniconazole, or GA3 in relation to total carbohydrate contents. Protein contents of H. hamabo were higher than those of H. syriacus. Uniconazole or GA3 increased those of H. hamabo and decreased those of H. syriacus. Peroxidase activity of H. hamabo was higher than that of H. syriacus. Uniconazole decreased that of H. hamabo and increased that of H. syriacus. GA3 or Ca (13.35 mM) treatment increased that of both species. ATPase activity of H. hamabo was higher than that of H. syriacus. Uniconazole (5 mg·liter–1), GA3, or Ca decreased that of H. hamabo increased that of H. syriacus.

Free access

Abstract

The anthocyanins in the flowers of crapemyrtle (Lagerstroemia) species and cultivars are the 3-glucosides of delphinidin, petunidin, and malvidin. These three pigments are also present in most of the cultivars of rose of sharon (Hibiscus syriacus), but one cultivar contained cyanidin 3-glucoside as the major petal pigment Thus, the development of plants with “true-red” petals is remotely possible in rose of sharon but unlikely in crapemyrtle.

Open Access
Authors: , , and

During the aging of H. syriacus flower, biosynthetic pathways of ethylene and polyamines, their interactions, and their effects on senescence were investigated. The evolution of ethylene in ephemeral flower was rapidly increased immediately after initiation of in-rolling of corolla at which EFE activity became maximum peak. After that, EFE activity was gradually decreased even though the aging was continued. Ethylene production was, however, slightly inhibited by the treatments of AOA and putrescine. The activity of ACC synthase and SAM decarboxylase were most rapidly increased at the time of 36th hrs. The contents of ACC and MACC were gradually increased from the early stage. However, ACC contents was decreased at the final stage but MACC was continuously increased. In normal condition, endogenous level of polyamines exists in the order of putrescine>spermidine>spermine. Putrescine was reduced from the initial point of aging, but spermidine and spermine were reduced from the middle and final stage of aging, respectively.

Free access

1 Present address: Washington State Univ., Puyallup, 7612 Pioneer Way, Puyallup, WA 98371. Univ. of Florida Journal Series no. 8452. This research was funded in part by a grant from the American Hibiscus Society

Free access
Authors: , , and

Five distinctive developmental stages were chronologically suggested. Cells at Stage I and II were essentially free of cytoplasmic or vacuolar abnormalities and the cytoplasm contained numerous electron-dense mitochondria with well-developed cristae. At Stage III, there were a localized dilation of mitochondria matrix and a partial-diluted cytoplasm in mesophyll cells. At Stage IV, characterized by high levels of fresh weight and osmolality, most mesophyll cells were seen to be ruptured, resulting in a general mixing of cell contents and diluting cytoplasm. It can be explained as an irreversible senescence phenomena that tonoplast in mesophyll cell was ruptured partly, corresponding to rapid increase in petal cell size and turgidity. Petal turgidity was due to an increase of content in soluble sugar. At Stage V, there was a loss of petal fresh weight. With a loss of turgidity, most mesophyll cells have collapsed completely. There were a notable plasmolysis in vasculature. The activity of protease in petals was found to increase between Stage II and III, and then decreased rapidly at Stage IV, resulting in the decrease of total protein content before senescence. Unexpectedly, there were stomata in hibiscus petals. Ultrastructural disorganization, like as a broken tonoplast, was observed in mesophyll cells at Stage IV. ABA and the stomata on petal might promote the disorganization. The final stages of senescence involved breakdown of cellular organization leading to hydrolysis of previously separated compartments. The cellular disorganization triggered during the flowers are still in the process of opening may be one of the earliest physiological signal that senescence is under way.

Free access