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Abstract

Translocation of 14C-labelled assimilates between partners of juvenile–adult grafts of English ivy (Hedera helix L.) was influenced by 14CO2 application technique, stem girdling, selective defoliation, and cytokinin treatment. Applications of the cytokinin, 6 benzylamimo purine (BA), to the shoot tip of the juvenile scion increased the amount of label translocated to the juvenile shoot. The results indicate the importance of precise manipulation of assimilate sources and sinks in order to insure translocation from presumptive donor to receptor in the grafted ivy system.

Open Access

Two experiments were conducted to determine the relative resistance of 33 selected cultivars of English ivy (Hedera helix L.) to soil- and shoot-applied NaCl. In the soil-applied NaCl experiment, ramets of the 33 cultivars were irrigated with a fertilizer + 0.25-N NaCl solution for 55 days. `Harrison', `Hibernica', `Thorndale', Wilson', and Woerner' exhibited the least amount of visible shoot damage. Dry weights of all cultivars were much lower in the salt treatment. In the shoot-applied NaCl experiment, plants were sprayed daily with a 0.25-n NaCl solution for 48 days. The young leaves and stems of all cultivars were severely injured by the salt spray, while the mature leaves and stems and the dormant buds were only slightly injured. Reduction in dry weight varied between cultivars. Two subsequent experiments focused on resistance to soil-applied NaCl. Ramets of the NaCl-resistant `Harrison', `Hibernica', and `Thorndale', and the NaCl-sensitive `Baltica', `Cathedral Wall', and Wingertsberg' were irrigated with a fertilizer + 0.25-N NaCl solution for 48 days. Whole-plant Cl content for all six cultivars was in the range of 30,000 ppm. Ramets of `Thorndale' and `Cathedral Wall' were irrigated with a fertilizer + 0.25-N NaCl solution for 30 days with replicate plants harvested at S-day intervals. `Cathedral Wall' accumulated more Cl at a faster rate than `Thorndale'. Mean whole-plant Cl concentration peaked at 97,000 ppm for `Cathedral Wall' and 40,000 ppm for `Thorndale'. Salt resistance may be partly based on slower uptake of Cl.

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Abstract

Cold hardiness of Hedera helix L. var. Thorndale was ultimately unaffected by photoperiod. Anthocyanin accumulation was a photoperiodic-high light intensity response. There was no correlation between anthocyanin content and cold hardiness in plants exposed to different photoperiods and light intensities.

Open Access
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Abstract

Micromorphology and chromosome number of Fatsia japonica Decne et Planch. ‘Moseri’, Hedera helix var. hibernica Kirchn., and their putative intergeneric hybrid, × Fatshedera lizei are surveyed. × Fatshedera lizei is intermediate in most characteristics of leaf surface morphology. Both H. helix and F. japonica have 2n = 48 chromosomes; a range of counts from 72-98 for × F. lizei suggests that it may be an unstable tetraploid. Comparisons of chromosome size suggest that both parental genomes are represented in the the karyotype of × F. lizei. Certain novel characteristics of the hybrid (inflorescence morphology, petiole morphology and anatomy, leaf vascular anatomy) are possibly the result of phenotypic expression of the hybrid genome or polyploid effects. Micromorphological characteristics can provide evidence of hybrid intermediacy when gross morphological features do not clearly identify hybrid origin.

Open Access

Abstract

Three lipid-like root-promoting compounds were isolated from the easy-to-root juvenile form of English ivy, Hedera helix L. The purification procedure involves extracting with methanol-chloroform and chromatography on columns of charcoal-celite, silica gel and LH-20 Sephadex. Ultraviolet and infrared spectroscopic studies suggest the presence of alcohol and nitrile functional groups. The 3 compounds are unstable and the instability is greatest when the substances are purified. In the purified state, the lipid-like compounds are colorless but become orange-yellow after breakdown. A loss of root-promoting activity occurs with the color change.

Open Access

Abstract

There is very little rooting response of juvenile shoot apices to indole-acetic acid (IAA) at concentrations from 1 to 50 mg/liter when the light intensity is 400–500 ft-c. Naphthalene-acetic acid (NAA), however, promotes rooting very markedly with an optimum at 5 to 10 mg/1. There is a strong synergism between IAA at 10 mg/1 and catechol at 5 × 10−5M which results in a rooting response equal to that obtained with NAA at its optimum concentration. In low intensity light (50 ft-c) IAA is nearly as effective as IAA + catechol in high light. Rooting of adult apices in high intensity light is essentially zero using IAA, NAA or combinations of these auxins with catechol. In low intensity light rooting occurs using 10 mg/1 IAA and there is a marked synergism between IAA and catechol. The rooting response of adult tips in low intensity light is very similar to that of juvenile shoot tips in high intensity light. Three fractions of methanolic extracts of adult and juvenile shoot tissue promote rooting of juvenile shoot apices in high intensity light. Rooting of adult apices is not affected by these or other fractions.

Open Access

sequence: ( A ) Hemigraphis alternata , Tradescantia pallida , Hedera helix , Fittonia argyroneura , Asparagus densiflorus , and Hoya carnosa ; ( B ) H. alternata , T. pallida , H. helix , A. densiflorus , H. carnosa , and F. argyroneura ; ( C

Free access

Asplenium nidus, Chamaedorea elegans ‘Neathe Bella’, Hedera helix ‘Chicago’, and Syngonium podophyllum ‘White Butterfly’. Typically, ethylene responses were very consistent for most genotypes harvested and treated at different times during the growing

Free access

jasmine ( Trachelospermum asiaticum ), candlestick plant ( Senna alata ), English ivy ( Hedera helix ), and lily-of-the-Nile ( Agapanthus africanus ) in Tennessee, USA. The planting material consisted of ≈3-cm-diameter corms for gladiolus, plant liners (72

Open Access

Ebb-and-flow irrigation reduced water and fertilizer use by ≈ 40% when compared to overhead hand-watering by hose in the production of Hedera helix. In contrast, water and fertilizer use were not significantly different between ebb-and-flow and drip irrigation systems in the production of Asiatic hybrid lilies. Adequate growth of Hedera helix `Baltica' was obtained with 50 mg N/liter of 20-10-20 (20N-4.4-16.6K) or 20-19-18 (20N-8.4P-14.9K). Also, good market-quality hybrid lilies were produced with 75 mg N/liter of 20-19-18 (20N-8.4P-14.9K), 16-4-12 (16N-1.8P-10K), 20-0-20 (20N-0P-16.6K), and 20-10-20 (20N-4.4P-16.6K).

Free access