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HISTORY The cultivated strawberry ( Fragaria × ananassa Duch. ex Rozier) originated from an accidental cross of the white-fruited Chilean strawberry [ F. chiloensis (L.) Mill. subsp. chiloensis f. chiloensis ] and the meadow strawberry ( F

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staining solution). Table 1. Characteristics of six intersimple sequence repeat primers used for the analysis of Fragaria chiloensis accessions. Intersimple sequence repeat data analysis. From the ISSR patterns, each band was denoted

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The founding genetic base of the commercial strawberry, Fragaria × ananassa Duchesne in Lamarck, is limited. It originated ≈250 years ago when a few clones of South American F. chiloensis chiloensis (L.) Miller subsp. chiloensis forma

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The primary cultivated strawberry, Fragaria × ananassa Duchesne ex Rozier, is believed to have arisen from a chance hybridization between the octoploid species F. chiloensis (L.) Miller subsp. chiloensis forma chiloensis and F

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Information Network ( USDA, ARS, National Genetic Resources Program, 2014 ) for ease of identifying subspecies ( Table 2 ). Table 2. Subspecies names and taxon codes for Fragaria virginiana and F. chiloensis . Weather data were collected from the Florida

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Twenty-five female clones of Fragaria chiloensis (L.) Duchesene collected from the California and Oregon coasts were surveyed for gas exchange rates under field conditions. Carbon assimilation (A) rates of native clones were 25% to 69% higher than for `Totem' (Fragaria × ananassa Duchesne) on a leaf-area basis (μmol of CO2 per sec/m2) and 7% to 77% higher when expressed on a leaf dry-weight basis (μmol of CO2 per kg dry wt/sec). Higher rates of stomatal conductance (gs) were observed in 16 of 25 F. chiloensis clones than in `Totem', with nine of 25 clones also having higher rates of transpiration (E). All clones had higher rates of residual conductance (gr) and greater water use efficiency (WUE) than the cultivated standard. The gas exchange characteristics of four strawberry cultivars (F. × ananassa) and four F. chiloensis genotypes were compared under standard greenhouse conditions. F. chiloensis genotypes had higher rates of A than cultivars when expressed on per leaf-area and dry-weight bases. Native clones also had higher rates of gs, gr, E, and WUE and greater quantum yield. Differences in chlorophyll content were observed among genotypes, but not between species.

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Abbreviations: FC, Fragaria chiloensis (L.) Duch. `BSP14'; FV, Fragaria virginiana (L.) Duch. `NCC85-13V'; RWC, relative water content; Ψ water potential; Ψ P , turgor potential; Ψ p osmotic potential; Ψπ 100 , osmotic potential at full turgor

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Abbreviations: FC, Fragaria chiloensis Duch. cv. `BSP14'; FV, Fragaria virginiana Duch. cv. `NCC85-13V'; RWC, relative water content; TSC, total soluble carbohydrates; ψ water potential; ψ π osmotic potential; ψ π 100 osmotic potential at full

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Abstract

The ‘Del Norte’ and ‘Yaquina’ clones of Fragaria chiloensis (L.) Duchesne exhibited a high degree of resistance to the strawberry aphid, Chaetosiphon fragaefolii (Cockerell), but a third clone, ‘OR-US 3162’, was very susceptible. Resistance of ‘Del Norte’ was transmitted to progeny when crossed with commercial strawberry cultivars, Fragaria × ananassa Duch. None of 30 commercial strawberry cultivars and advanced selections tested showed resistance to this aphid.

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Abstract

Thirty clones of the beach strawberry, Fragaria chiloensis (L.) Duch., that were known to be resistant to strawberry aphid, Chaetosiphon fragaefolii (Cockerell), were evaluated for resistance to twospotted spider mite, Tetranychus urticae Koch. AH clones had fewer mites per leaf than the cultivar ‘Totem’. Two clones, BSP-14 and LCM-19, had totals of only 6 and 82 mites, respectively, on 4 dates compared to 1741 mites on ‘Totem’. The ‘Del Norte’ clone of F. chiloensis, previously used as a source of aphid resistance in breeding, was more susceptible than BSP-14 and LCM-19 to the mite.

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