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pods of Baptisia are inflated while those of Thermopsis are compressed ( Chen et al., 1994 ). Although polyploidy is wide-spread in the Fabaceae, no polyploids have been found in Baptisia and only two polyploids have been found in Thermopsis , T

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Revised treatments of the genera Centrosema (DC.) Benth. (Leguminosae: Fabaceae) and Clitoris L. follow the style used in Hortus Third. Inventory of species, nomenclature, authorities, morphological descriptions, and distributions have been updated.

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Eastern redbud ( Cercis canadensis L.) and Texas redbud [ Cercis canadensis var. texensis (S. Watson) M. Hopkins] (Fabaceae Lindl. or Leguminosae Adans.) are popular landscape trees. Their moderate size, early spring flowering, and wide

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Eastern redbud (Cercis canadensis L.) is a commonly used small landscape tree. Compact growth, purple leaf color, and weeping architecture are three popular ornamental phenotypes. Inheritances of weeping architecture and purple leaves have been reported previously. Inheritance of compact growth habit and its genetic linkage with the weeping and purple leaf genes have not been reported. In the present research, the inheritance of compact growth derived from ‘Ace of Hearts’ was explored in the F1, F2, and reciprocal backcross families resulting from the controlled hybridization of ‘Ruby Falls’ (normal growth/weeping architecture/purple leaf) × ‘Ace of Hearts’ (compact growth/nonweeping architecture/green leaf). All 27 F1 individuals were nonweeping, green-leaved, and noncompact. A total of 572 F2 progeny were obtained, and subsequent analysis of segregation revealed a single recessive gene controlled compact growth habit. Analysis of reciprocal backcross families confirmed this result as well. Weeping architecture and purple leaf color were also controlled by single recessive genes, confirming findings presented in previous studies in another redbud family. No linkage between the three genes was detected. This research is the first to report the inheritance of compact growth in eastern redbud and confirms independent assortment between the compact, purple leaf, and weeping genes.

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The seedcoat permeability, uptake, and transport of model fluorescent tracers were investigated in snapbean (Phaseolus vulgaris), pepper (Capsicum annuum), tomato (Solanum lycopersicum), onion (Allium cepa), cucumber (Cucumis sativus), and lettuce (Lactuca sativa) seeds. Nine fluorescent tracers and one vital stain were selected to represent a diversity of physicochemical properties (lipophilicity, electrical charge, etc.) and to simulate behavior of applied seed treatments. To study seedcoat permeability, tracers were applied to seeds as dry powders, and treated seeds were sown in moistened sand at 20 °C and removed after 18 to 24 h, a time before visible germination. Imbibed seeds were dissected and fluorescence (staining) was observed in embryos with a dissecting microscope under ultraviolet (365 nm) or visible radiation. Seedcoat permeability of species to solutes was grouped into three categories: 1) permeable—snapbeans; 2) selectively permeable—tomato, pepper, and onion; and 3) non-permeable—cucumber and lettuce. Systemic tracers that failed to permeate seedcoats during seed imbibition were taken up by roots or hypocotyls after visible germination.

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The genus Cercis L. (Fabaceae: Caesalpinoideae: Cercideae), also known as redbud, is a valuable commodity in the North American landscape industry and can be found growing in temperate environments across the globe. Cercis consists of ≈10

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Mungbean [ V. radiata (L.) R. Wilczek], a member of the Fabaceae family (also known as the Leguminosae family) along with the common pea, chickpea, soybean, alfalfa, and other crops, is a native of India–Burma (Myanmar) region of Asia and is grown

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species requires development of cultural practices specific to each species ( Shock et al., 2015 ). Legumes (Fabaceae) are valuable in the Great Basin ecosystem, because they can provide biologically fixed nitrogen to associated species and can enhance

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Soybean, Glycine max (L.) Merril is an annual self-pollinated diploid legume (sub-family Fabaceae). In the 1990s, soybean production in the far east, as in ancient times, was primarily for food consumption. Today, vegetable soybean is the dominant soyfood in Asia and is gaining popularity in the United States because of its versatility and nutrient value. Dozens of different forms of food have been developed from it. Tofu is one of the most important of these. Twenty four cultivars of vegetable soybean from two regional tofu tests (Alabama A&M and Virginia State Univ.) and 10 cultivars from the Alabama A&M Univ. soybean breeding project were evaluated for the physical and chemical characteristic of the resultant tofu. Data on protein, tofu yield, moisture content, tofu texture, and structure were recorded. Shear-force (used to evaluate texture) was determined with a Kramer Shear cell and micro-structure was examined using a scanning electron microscope. Seed protein content ranged from 30 to 54%. Tofu yield ranged from 41.9 to 83.0 g and texture of tofu ranged from 10 to 62.3 lb.

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