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) for this species using the fast isolation by AFLP of sequences containing repeats (FIASCO) protocol of Zane et al. (2002) . We describe the development of 10 microsatellite loci for T. wallichiana . DNA was extracted from dried leaf tissues and

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The Chinese Incense-cedar (Calocedrus macrolepis Kruz), an important wood and ornamental tree, is native to southwest China and also in northern Vietnam, Laos, Thailand, and Myanmar. As a result of ecological degradation in these areas, Chinese Incense-cedar was considered a vulnerable species according to the criteria of the International Union for the Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources. In the current report, we developed and characterized 13 novel microsatellite markers for this species using the protocol of fast isolation by amplified fragment length polymorphism of sequences containing repeats. Polymorphism of each locus was assessed in 36 individuals from nine geographical populations. The number of alleles per locus ranged from two to nine with an average of 6.08. The observed and expected heterozygosities ranged from 0.0000 to 1.0000 and from 0.1549 to 0.8912 with averages of 0.6688 and 0.6815, respectively. Four of the 13 loci were significantly deviated from Hardy-Weinberg expectations. No significant linkage disequilibrium was detected. These polymorphic microsatellite markers would be useful tools for investigating genetic population structure and diversity to establish conservation strategy for this interesting and vulnerable species.

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was extracted from one individual of P. obconica from Hubei province (long. 30°53′ N, lat. 111°20′ E), which is located in central China. Two enriched microsatellite libraries [(AC) 15 and (AG) 15 ] were constructed according to the FIASCO protocol

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information content, and easy to be amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) ( Nichols et al., 2003 ). It has been widely used in population genetic analysis, paternity testing, genome mapping, and marker assisted selection. FIASCO first proposed in 2002

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) method ( Milligan, 1992 ). The isolation of microsatellite loci was performed according to the fast isolation of microsatellite by amplified fragment length polymorphism of sequences containing repeats (FIASCO) ( Zane et al., 2002 ). Approximately 300 ng

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screened using a fast isolation by amplified fragment length polymorphism of sequences containing repeats (FIASCO) protocol with some modifications ( Zane et al., 2002 ). First, total genomic DNA of P. rex (≈1000 ng) was completely digested with 2.5U of

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isolation by amplified fragment length polymorphism of sequences containing repeats (FIASCO) ( Zane et al., 2002 ). Approximately 250 ng of genomic DNA was digested into 200 to 1000 bp by a restriction enzyme Mbo I (TaKaRa, Japan) and the resulting

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(FIASCO) ( Zane et al., 2002 ). Briefly, about 250 ng of genomic DNA was completely digested with 5 U of Mse I restriction enzyme (Fermantas, Canada) in a 20 μL volume, and then 15 μL of digested DNA was ligated to 1 μ m Mse I amplified fragment length

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efficiently. In this study, we used Roche 454 pyrosequencing technology combined with magnetic bead enrichment FIASCO to isolate 2614 microsatellite markers for S. helferi . The resulting SSR sequences were characterized and validated through successful

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primers. We used Roche 454 sequencing combined with the magnetic bead enrichment method of FIASCO to isolate SSR markers from the carpetgrass genome. A total of 1,942 microsatellite loci were identified in 53,193 raw sequencing reads. To test the primer

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